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LEGAL DICTIONARY

Notice Period

A notice period is a duration of time that you must legally provide if you wish to terminate a working or contractual relationship. This sets the minimum amount of time that you must inform other parties before ending the agreement.

Understanding how notice periods work and when they must be followed are essential considerations when you enter into any legal contract. Find out more about how these important terms work functionally and what you must and mustn’t do with regards to the notice you give.

Contractual Notice Periods and How They Work

Notice periods are built into many contracts for a wide range of reasons. This is primarily because they provide a reasonable amount of time for parties in the agreement to plan and prepare if another signatory drops out.

In almost every case, notice must be given in writing so there is a hard record of your intention to terminate the contract. This can then be used as proof that you have or haven’t followed the terms and conditions of your agreement.

Notice Periods on Resignation Letters

Notice periods are most commonly used on resignation letters. When you decide to leave your current job, providing this will be the first step in the process of exiting the company.

When you complete a resignation letter template to quit a job, you must make sure the notice you give complies with the terms of your employment contract. Your employer will set the minimum period based on the seniority and importance of your role in the company. It is specifically designed to allow them sufficient time to organize for your replacement.

Usually, you will be expected to provide at minimum 2- 4 weeks of notice, using a two weeks notice letter. However, if you’re in a more significant role such as a CMO or CFO, or CEO position you might need to provide several months’ notice as you will be harder to replace.

What Happens If You Don’t Follow The Notice Period

Not following the notice period set in your contract can lead to a breach and, potentially, significant legal headaches.

If you have to leave an agreement early and can’t provide minimum notice you could be held to the contract and therefore subject to any fees or duties you previously agreed to. You will need to negotiate with the other party to minimize or fully end these obligations before the contract was originally due to end.

If however, you commit a significant breach of the contract by not complying with it at all the matter could be taken to court. In this case, you still may be legally held to the contract or successfully sued by the damaged party.

A notice period is a duration of time that you must legally provide if you wish to terminate a working or contractual relationship. This sets the minimum amount of time that you must inform other parties before ending the agreement.

Understanding how notice periods work and when they must be followed are essential considerations when you enter into any legal contract. Find out more about how these important terms work functionally and what you must and mustn’t do with regards to the notice you give.

Contractual Notice Periods and How They Work

Notice periods are built into many contracts for a wide range of reasons. This is primarily because they provide a reasonable amount of time for parties in the agreement to plan and prepare if another signatory drops out.

In almost every case, notice must be given in writing so there is a hard record of your intention to terminate the contract. This can then be used as proof that you have or haven’t followed the terms and conditions of your agreement.

Notice Periods on Resignation Letters

Notice periods are most commonly used on resignation letters. When you decide to leave your current job, providing this will be the first step in the process of exiting the company.

When you complete a resignation letter template to quit a job, you must make sure the notice you give complies with the terms of your employment contract. Your employer will set the minimum period based on the seniority and importance of your role in the company. It is specifically designed to allow them sufficient time to organize for your replacement.

Usually, you will be expected to provide at minimum 2- 4 weeks of notice, using a two weeks notice letter. However, if you’re in a more significant role such as a CMO or CFO, or CEO position you might need to provide several months’ notice as you will be harder to replace.

What Happens If You Don’t Follow The Notice Period

Not following the notice period set in your contract can lead to a breach and, potentially, significant legal headaches.

If you have to leave an agreement early and can’t provide minimum notice you could be held to the contract and therefore subject to any fees or duties you previously agreed to. You will need to negotiate with the other party to minimize or fully end these obligations before the contract was originally due to end.

If however, you commit a significant breach of the contract by not complying with it at all the matter could be taken to court. In this case, you still may be legally held to the contract or successfully sued by the damaged party.