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Are you looking forward to retirement? Then you are among 68% of workers eagerly awaiting retirement. If you plan to retire from a position, your manager and human resources department might know your plans. Transitioning from a full-time career to retirement takes months of planning.

It is beneficial to prepare a retirement letter even when planning your retirement since documentation of your retirement plans is precious to your employer. This letter also goes into your employment record alongside other essential details, such as your start date, compensation, benefits, and performance notes.

A retirement letter ensures you leave your employer and career on a positive note. Besides, your employer will have ample time to prepare all the paperwork on your behalf, with 6-12 months' notice being a rule of thumb. Here's how to write your retirement letter well and professionally.

Retirement Letter Example

Review our Retirement Letter example below to know the exact details you should include in your letter. Use our example to professionally advise your employer that you are retiring.

[Name]

[Address]

[Phone number]

[Email address]

[Date]

[Manager’s name]

[Manager’s title]

[Company name]

[Workplace Address]

Dear [Manager],

I am writing to notify you of my upcoming retirement. My last day at [Company] will be [date].

I am eternally thankful for the opportunity to spend the last [years working with the company] with [Company].

I acquired a vast amount of knowledge and feel that my [abilities] developed significantly during my time as [job title].

It’s been a pleasure to be part of [project/company] and collaborate with [clients].

Please, don’t hesitate to ask if you need any help making the transition following my retirement a simple process. I would have no problem helping hire or training my replacement.

I wish you all the best!

Kind Regards,

[Name]

What Should You Include in Your Retirement Letter?

A retirement letter confirms a person's resignation letter and requests retirement benefits from their employer. In most organizations, retirement candidates are highly skilled employees. It is, therefore, best to give the employer enough time to prepare for the departure. Here is what to include:

  • Formal letterhead. Use a formal business letter format here, ‌including a formal letterhead. The letter should contain your name, title, and contact information. On a physical letter, these should appear at the top. You can include this information at the bottom after signing off if you are emailing.
  • Salutation and intent to resign. It is enough to address the supervisor/manager in "Dear [supervisor/manager's name]." Then, state that you are retiring from X position and give your last day of work.
  • The body. Explain your retirement plans and why you are retiring (e.g., "more time with my family..."). Express your gratitude for the experience and personal and professional growth. Let your employer also know if you are comfortable helping with the transition.
  • Formal sign-off. If you're moving, let your former employer know your new address so they can contact you if necessary. Sign off your letter with a formal sign-off (e.g., "Sincerely") and include your name and signature. If you are emailing, email signatures are acceptable.

Tips To Polish and Make Your Retirement Letter Professional

After many years of devoted service, retirement is a rewarding experience. Many people enjoy this phase of life, while others find it hard to let go. You can close doors on one opportunity and open up new ones with a well-written retirement letter to your employer. Retirement letters can be challenging and emotionally draining to write. Your letter needs to reflect your career growth and development. Here are some tips to polish up the letter:

  • Check your eligibility for all retirement benefits before proclaiming your retirement date.
  • Calculate your pension benefits.
  • Ensure your 401(k) plan is fully vested and make plans for when you will start taking Social Security.
  • Research any benefits you plan to take with you, in this case, a pension or 401(k), before sending your letter so that the benefits are all secure and handled appropriately.

Provide ample notice

In the months before they leave, some companies may delay the process in order to allow older employees to choose and train a successor and mentor younger employees. However, some employers may ask you to leave shortly after your retirement notice. If possible, give reasonable notice to make time for this process, just like when you hand in a two weeks’ notice.

Share some of your achievements and express gratitude

An employee retirement letter is a wonderful way to thank an employer for the opportunity of working with them for so long. You can also use it to list your accomplishments and successes at work. Positive words and praise for the company, your boss, and your team are essential.

Allow The Possibility of Seasonal Work or Consulting

The US Department of Labor reports that an average American spends about 20 years in retirement, with 55 percent intending to continue working. If you fall into this category, be sure to mention the work you are most interested in pursuing if you wish to take on part-time or occasional consulting projects. Explain that you can assist with specific types of projects. Be explicit that you would like to stay involved.

Provide transitional help

Older workers are experts in their fields. The institutional knowledge of working for a company for a decade or more is valuable. Mentoring younger employees, finding a replacement for your current position, and even training someone else to fill your former position may be possible. Allow yourself time to transfer knowledge, teach others, and mention that you are looking for talent who might become an asset to the organization.

Share your plans

Traveling, spending time with grandchildren, volunteering in your community, or embarking on a new career might all be reasons to retire. There may be health issues or the need to look after a family member that forces you to leave your job. Let your colleagues know about your plans to the extent that you want to make them known.

Tips for Giving Notice of Your Retirement

When you retire, you will hopefully depart on a pleasant note. Over time, you have built quality relationships with coworkers, achieved milestones, and grown personally and professionally.

Retirement can, however, feel like a last resort. Your time with your company may have been a disappointment, or you might feel burnt out.

Here's how you can retire with your head held high:

Keep your boss in the know- Most likely, you have already started planning for retirement years ago. During your retirement planning, keep your boss informed so they can find a replacement.

Avoid complaining to coworkers- No matter what, don't use the last few weeks of your employment with the company as an opportunity to vent. Focus on your future instead of your complaints.

Give constructive criticism - A company's exit interview will allow you to share any feedback about your employer, manager, and team. It is an excellent time to discuss your issues to help create a better workplace for your successor. Keep your criticism constructive, focusing on how human resources can help its employees enjoy a better future. Be thankful for the relationships you've built and the experiences you've had in your role.

Hand in all company property - hand in your laptop, mobile device, badge, and all company property as soon as possible.

Retirement is an exciting but often stressful life event. Leaving your employer under the best possible terms will help ensure you enjoy looking forward to your upcoming retirement with minimal worries.

Are you looking forward to retirement? Then you are among 68% of workers eagerly awaiting retirement. If you plan to retire from a position, your manager and human resources department might know your plans. Transitioning from a full-time career to retirement takes months of planning.

It is beneficial to prepare a retirement letter even when planning your retirement since documentation of your retirement plans is precious to your employer. This letter also goes into your employment record alongside other essential details, such as your start date, compensation, benefits, and performance notes.

A retirement letter ensures you leave your employer and career on a positive note. Besides, your employer will have ample time to prepare all the paperwork on your behalf, with 6-12 months' notice being a rule of thumb. Here's how to write your retirement letter well and professionally.

Retirement Letter Example

Review our Retirement Letter example below to know the exact details you should include in your letter. Use our example to professionally advise your employer that you are retiring.

[Name]

[Address]

[Phone number]

[Email address]

[Date]

[Manager’s name]

[Manager’s title]

[Company name]

[Workplace Address]

Dear [Manager],

I am writing to notify you of my upcoming retirement. My last day at [Company] will be [date].

I am eternally thankful for the opportunity to spend the last [years working with the company] with [Company].

I acquired a vast amount of knowledge and feel that my [abilities] developed significantly during my time as [job title].

It’s been a pleasure to be part of [project/company] and collaborate with [clients].

Please, don’t hesitate to ask if you need any help making the transition following my retirement a simple process. I would have no problem helping hire or training my replacement.

I wish you all the best!

Kind Regards,

[Name]

What Should You Include in Your Retirement Letter?

A retirement letter confirms a person's resignation letter and requests retirement benefits from their employer. In most organizations, retirement candidates are highly skilled employees. It is, therefore, best to give the employer enough time to prepare for the departure. Here is what to include:

  • Formal letterhead. Use a formal business letter format here, ‌including a formal letterhead. The letter should contain your name, title, and contact information. On a physical letter, these should appear at the top. You can include this information at the bottom after signing off if you are emailing.
  • Salutation and intent to resign. It is enough to address the supervisor/manager in "Dear [supervisor/manager's name]." Then, state that you are retiring from X position and give your last day of work.
  • The body. Explain your retirement plans and why you are retiring (e.g., "more time with my family..."). Express your gratitude for the experience and personal and professional growth. Let your employer also know if you are comfortable helping with the transition.
  • Formal sign-off. If you're moving, let your former employer know your new address so they can contact you if necessary. Sign off your letter with a formal sign-off (e.g., "Sincerely") and include your name and signature. If you are emailing, email signatures are acceptable.

Tips To Polish and Make Your Retirement Letter Professional

After many years of devoted service, retirement is a rewarding experience. Many people enjoy this phase of life, while others find it hard to let go. You can close doors on one opportunity and open up new ones with a well-written retirement letter to your employer. Retirement letters can be challenging and emotionally draining to write. Your letter needs to reflect your career growth and development. Here are some tips to polish up the letter:

  • Check your eligibility for all retirement benefits before proclaiming your retirement date.
  • Calculate your pension benefits.
  • Ensure your 401(k) plan is fully vested and make plans for when you will start taking Social Security.
  • Research any benefits you plan to take with you, in this case, a pension or 401(k), before sending your letter so that the benefits are all secure and handled appropriately.

Provide ample notice

In the months before they leave, some companies may delay the process in order to allow older employees to choose and train a successor and mentor younger employees. However, some employers may ask you to leave shortly after your retirement notice. If possible, give reasonable notice to make time for this process, just like when you hand in a two weeks’ notice.

Share some of your achievements and express gratitude

An employee retirement letter is a wonderful way to thank an employer for the opportunity of working with them for so long. You can also use it to list your accomplishments and successes at work. Positive words and praise for the company, your boss, and your team are essential.

Allow The Possibility of Seasonal Work or Consulting

The US Department of Labor reports that an average American spends about 20 years in retirement, with 55 percent intending to continue working. If you fall into this category, be sure to mention the work you are most interested in pursuing if you wish to take on part-time or occasional consulting projects. Explain that you can assist with specific types of projects. Be explicit that you would like to stay involved.

Provide transitional help

Older workers are experts in their fields. The institutional knowledge of working for a company for a decade or more is valuable. Mentoring younger employees, finding a replacement for your current position, and even training someone else to fill your former position may be possible. Allow yourself time to transfer knowledge, teach others, and mention that you are looking for talent who might become an asset to the organization.

Share your plans

Traveling, spending time with grandchildren, volunteering in your community, or embarking on a new career might all be reasons to retire. There may be health issues or the need to look after a family member that forces you to leave your job. Let your colleagues know about your plans to the extent that you want to make them known.

Tips for Giving Notice of Your Retirement

When you retire, you will hopefully depart on a pleasant note. Over time, you have built quality relationships with coworkers, achieved milestones, and grown personally and professionally.

Retirement can, however, feel like a last resort. Your time with your company may have been a disappointment, or you might feel burnt out.

Here's how you can retire with your head held high:

Keep your boss in the know- Most likely, you have already started planning for retirement years ago. During your retirement planning, keep your boss informed so they can find a replacement.

Avoid complaining to coworkers- No matter what, don't use the last few weeks of your employment with the company as an opportunity to vent. Focus on your future instead of your complaints.

Give constructive criticism - A company's exit interview will allow you to share any feedback about your employer, manager, and team. It is an excellent time to discuss your issues to help create a better workplace for your successor. Keep your criticism constructive, focusing on how human resources can help its employees enjoy a better future. Be thankful for the relationships you've built and the experiences you've had in your role.

Hand in all company property - hand in your laptop, mobile device, badge, and all company property as soon as possible.

Retirement is an exciting but often stressful life event. Leaving your employer under the best possible terms will help ensure you enjoy looking forward to your upcoming retirement with minimal worries.