Contact us whenever you need it!

+1 855 997 0206

Contact hours: Mon-Fri 8am - 5pm ET

Meetings with your small business clients can go much smoother if you have prepared by writing a business proposal. A well-thought-out, visually appealing, meticulously edited document can not only support a pitch but increase confidence.

Both you and your employees, as well as your potential client, will be more comfortable with your presentation if you have formally drawn up a business proposal. When you start a business, you need to be prepared to draft professional pitches.

But how do you know when to be ready with a business proposal? And what should be included to make the most significant impact upon the potential client? Now that you have a value proposition, you can solicit new clients and grow your customer base.

Your value proposition should be well thought out and direct the potential client towards how your offerings differ from their current situation and what your competitors are offering.

Conveying a value proposition through a visual medium, a business proposal will be tailored to your individual company. Some may be standard-issue brochures, while you also may consider creating a new proposal for a crucial client development meeting. Whenever you decide your small business needs a business proposal, remember the following points.

ReadMore:Business Documents to Start-Up a Business

What Is a Business Proposal?

It is essential to understand that a business proposal, while not a legal document, is formal. You need to use high-level business writing skills combined with creative and data visualizations to make your proposal appealing. No one wants to read pages of text or a middle-school book report. And if you must draft a legal document, you can find resources for how to write a business contract.

Additionally, a business proposal differs from a business plan. Through a proposal you are aiming to sell yourself or your products. A plan is a larger encapsulation of your current situation and how you anticipate growing and is typically tailored for fundraising.

Types of Business Proposals

There are three main types of business proposals that differ based on your method to attract customers.

The first is a formally solicited proposal. Simply, this is when a client or potential customer directly asks you to provide them with a document for review. Usually, these accompany pitch meetings and should be written specifically for the client.

An informally solicited business proposal should be drafted in response to a potential opening a customer has given. For example, if a potential client seems interested in your company at a networking or development event, you can follow up by sending them a proposal.

Finally, you can cold call or mail unsolicited business proposals. Marketing materials such as brochures and flyers can be used to convey your value proposition to parties that may have a need for your services.

Sections of a Written Business Proposal

Each business proposal you write should vary based on the intended client, product, or service you are advertising and the current business climate. Remember to ensure your submissions are well-written and create trust.

However, there are a few sections that should be included in every business proposal. These are highlighted below. While the order below can be used for most proposals, some areas can be moved based on your tactical goals.

Business Proposal Title Page

Your title page should clearly include your company's name, your contact information, and what you are proposing. If you developed the document especially for a client (or even adjusted a pre-made template), make sure the customer’s name is also listed.

Table of Contents

Make sure the client can quickly get an overview of what is in your proposal and where to find the information they are interested in by having a well-laid-out table of contents.

Executive Summary

In the executive summary, provide the client a 10,000-foot view of what your value proposition can do for their business. This section sets up the remainder of the proposal to drill down in detail about your services or products and what sets you apart.

Problem and Proposed Solution

Many companies rely on the adage that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. In the problem and proposed solution section, you need to demonstrate to the client that they have a need that your business solutions can address.

Qualifications / About Us

Especially if you are pitching an entirely new client, you need to build trust before a business pays for your wares. The qualifications section of a business proposal can explain your unique background story, current situation, and future aspirations.

Be authentic, highlighting your mission statement while humanizing yourself and your team. Unlike other sections, you may want to be less formal and allow your perspective and people to shine through.

Pricing

The meat of the business proposal and sometimes the only thing a client may be interested in, the pricing section is the bottom-line dollars and cents.

However, do not think of this section as merely showing the client what your services or goods will cost them. A well-designed pricing proposal will also display how much their business will save by adopting your proposed solutions.

Terms and Conditions

If your proposal requires licensing agreements, is a limited-time-offer or comes with other legal contingencies, be open about these details. No one wants a deal to fall apart because you and the client were not on the same page about a vital term from the start.

Acceptance and Signing

This section only belongs in business proposals that are also formal offers or engagement letters. You can create a contract on the spot by adding an area where the client can legally accept your bid and terms. However, this can be inappropriate for many business meetings, so ensure you only include a signature box when necessary.

Are you ready to create a winning business proposal? Remember to make it visually appealing and edit and proofread the document before sending it to the client. And if you need a business form you can find it at LawDistrict.


Business Forms

Meetings with your small business clients can go much smoother if you have prepared by writing a business proposal. A well-thought-out, visually appealing, meticulously edited document can not only support a pitch but increase confidence.

Both you and your employees, as well as your potential client, will be more comfortable with your presentation if you have formally drawn up a business proposal. When you start a business, you need to be prepared to draft professional pitches.

But how do you know when to be ready with a business proposal? And what should be included to make the most significant impact upon the potential client? Now that you have a value proposition, you can solicit new clients and grow your customer base.

Your value proposition should be well thought out and direct the potential client towards how your offerings differ from their current situation and what your competitors are offering.

Conveying a value proposition through a visual medium, a business proposal will be tailored to your individual company. Some may be standard-issue brochures, while you also may consider creating a new proposal for a crucial client development meeting. Whenever you decide your small business needs a business proposal, remember the following points.

ReadMore:Business Documents to Start-Up a Business

What Is a Business Proposal?

It is essential to understand that a business proposal, while not a legal document, is formal. You need to use high-level business writing skills combined with creative and data visualizations to make your proposal appealing. No one wants to read pages of text or a middle-school book report. And if you must draft a legal document, you can find resources for how to write a business contract.

Additionally, a business proposal differs from a business plan. Through a proposal you are aiming to sell yourself or your products. A plan is a larger encapsulation of your current situation and how you anticipate growing and is typically tailored for fundraising.

Types of Business Proposals

There are three main types of business proposals that differ based on your method to attract customers.

The first is a formally solicited proposal. Simply, this is when a client or potential customer directly asks you to provide them with a document for review. Usually, these accompany pitch meetings and should be written specifically for the client.

An informally solicited business proposal should be drafted in response to a potential opening a customer has given. For example, if a potential client seems interested in your company at a networking or development event, you can follow up by sending them a proposal.

Finally, you can cold call or mail unsolicited business proposals. Marketing materials such as brochures and flyers can be used to convey your value proposition to parties that may have a need for your services.

Sections of a Written Business Proposal

Each business proposal you write should vary based on the intended client, product, or service you are advertising and the current business climate. Remember to ensure your submissions are well-written and create trust.

However, there are a few sections that should be included in every business proposal. These are highlighted below. While the order below can be used for most proposals, some areas can be moved based on your tactical goals.

Business Proposal Title Page

Your title page should clearly include your company's name, your contact information, and what you are proposing. If you developed the document especially for a client (or even adjusted a pre-made template), make sure the customer’s name is also listed.

Table of Contents

Make sure the client can quickly get an overview of what is in your proposal and where to find the information they are interested in by having a well-laid-out table of contents.

Executive Summary

In the executive summary, provide the client a 10,000-foot view of what your value proposition can do for their business. This section sets up the remainder of the proposal to drill down in detail about your services or products and what sets you apart.

Problem and Proposed Solution

Many companies rely on the adage that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. In the problem and proposed solution section, you need to demonstrate to the client that they have a need that your business solutions can address.

Qualifications / About Us

Especially if you are pitching an entirely new client, you need to build trust before a business pays for your wares. The qualifications section of a business proposal can explain your unique background story, current situation, and future aspirations.

Be authentic, highlighting your mission statement while humanizing yourself and your team. Unlike other sections, you may want to be less formal and allow your perspective and people to shine through.

Pricing

The meat of the business proposal and sometimes the only thing a client may be interested in, the pricing section is the bottom-line dollars and cents.

However, do not think of this section as merely showing the client what your services or goods will cost them. A well-designed pricing proposal will also display how much their business will save by adopting your proposed solutions.

Terms and Conditions

If your proposal requires licensing agreements, is a limited-time-offer or comes with other legal contingencies, be open about these details. No one wants a deal to fall apart because you and the client were not on the same page about a vital term from the start.

Acceptance and Signing

This section only belongs in business proposals that are also formal offers or engagement letters. You can create a contract on the spot by adding an area where the client can legally accept your bid and terms. However, this can be inappropriate for many business meetings, so ensure you only include a signature box when necessary.

Are you ready to create a winning business proposal? Remember to make it visually appealing and edit and proofread the document before sending it to the client. And if you need a business form you can find it at LawDistrict.


Business Forms