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Due to repeated pandemic shutdowns, many citizens across the United States continue to struggle financially. This has led to a large number of tenants being unable to pay their rent fees, thus putting them in danger of eviction.

To help minimize the impact of COVID-19 on tenants, the federal government alongside various counties and states have enacted measures placing moratoriums on evictions and banning utility shutoffs.

Keep reading to learn about the specific tenant protections in your state, as well as how eviction protection regulations have changed over time.

What Is a Federal Eviction Moratorium?

A federal eviction moratorium is a ban on evictions put in place by the federal government.

This means, in most cases, landlords could not evict tenants for unpaid rent throughout the United States.

Normally, it is up to each state to decide its own eviction laws,

However, due to the national emergency brought on by the pandemic, the federal government put this moratorium into effect.

On August 26, 2021, the Supreme Court ruled to end the federal eviction moratorium. All decisions regarding bans on evictions are now being decided at the state and local levels.

Eviction Moratorium Timeline

During the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. various eviction moratoriums were established in response to mass job loss and unemployment. The first of these was included in the CARES act, applying to federally-backed properties.

After its expiry on July 24, 2020, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an agency order known as “Temporary Halt in Residential Evictions to Prevent the Further Spread of Covid-19”.

This order was effective from September 4 until December 31 of 2020, during which evictions were banned in any jurisdiction where the order was applied and for all residential properties in which the tenant met certain criteria.

After the end of the moratorium on the night of January 1 2021, it was immediately extended to January 31. Following President Biden’s inauguration, the order was again extended until March 31.

These federal eviction protections were then extended by the CDC through to June 30, 2021, and one additional extension was enacted until July 31, 2021. Although this was originally meant to be the final moratorium, due to significant political pressure the CDC issued an additional extension for counties with considerable community levels of COVID-19 transmission.

This current ban on evictions will end on October 3 2021, and while additional nationwide bans have not yet been announced, further state and local tenant protections may be issued depending on location.

Who Does the Moratorium Protect?

The current eviction agency order enacted on August 3, 2021 only prohibits landlords from evicting tenants that meet certain criteria. It also only applies to counties with “substantial” or “high” community transmission rates of COVID-19. To check if your county fulfills this requirement, consult the CDC COVID-19 Integrated County View page.

To qualify for protection from eviction, a tenant must also meet the following criteria:

  • Have earned less than $99,000 in 2020 or expected to earn lass than this amount in 2021 ($198,000 if filing jointly with another person)
  • Not have had to report any income to the IRS in 2020 or have received an Economic Impact Payment (stimulus check)
  • Have used their best efforts to obtain government housing assistance
  • Are not able to pay their rent due to significant income loss
  • Have made their best efforts to make partial rent payments
  • Would become homeless or have to move into shared living after eviction

Tenants wanting protection from eviction will need to complete a declaration under penalty of perjury that they meet the order’s criteria. Anyone violating the order may face criminal penalties such as jail time or fines.

It’s also important to note that certain states have additional tenant eviction bans that provide more protection than the current agency order. Make sure you check your area's regulations to see if you fulfill the necessary requirements.


Create a Eviction Notice Now

Eviction Protection Status for All States

The overview below includes the latest information on COVID-19 eviction protections by state. Please be advised that this information is changing frequently (sometimes on an hourly basis), so it’s important that you check your state’s government website regularly for up-to-date information on evictions.

State Ban On Evictions Ban on Utility Shutoffs
Alabama No No
Alaska No No
Arizona No No
Arkansas No No
California Yes No
Colorado No No
Connecticut No No
Delaware No No
District of Columbia Yes Yes
Florida No No
Georgia No No
Hawaii No No
Idaho No No
Illinois No No
Indiana No No
Iowa No No
Kansas No No
Kentucky No No
Louisiana No No
Maine No No
Maryland No No
Massachusetts No [3] No
Michigan No No
Minnesota No No
Mississippi No No
Missouri No No
Montana No No
Nebraska No No
Nevada No No
New Hampshire No No
New Jersey No [5] No
New Mexico Yes [6] No
New York No [7] No
North Carolina No No
North Dakota No No
Ohio No No
Oklahoma No No
Oregon No No
Pennsylvania No No
Rhode Island No No
South Carolina No No
South Dakota No No
Tennessee No No
Texas No [8] No
Utah No No
Vermont No No
Virginia No No
Washington No [9] No
West Virginia No No
Wisconsin No No
Wyoming No No

Update: June 14,, 2022

California Eviction Moratorium

The eviction moratorium has been extended through June 30, 2022, to tenants earning less than 80% of the area median income if they submitted a completed application for rental relief before March 31, 2022. Since April 1, 2022, all renters must pay their rent and utilities.

Check your city or county to see if they have special dispositions in place. Some examples include:

  • Los Angeles: Some tenants have untilt May 2023 to pay back rent that is owed to their landlords. This means there is still an eviction ban until that time for those who qualify.
  • San Francisco: Renters who have a pending application for the California COVID-19 Rent Relief Program may not be evicted until June 30, 2022.
  • San Diego: The city council voted to approve a new eviction moratorium, called the “No-fault Eviction Moratorium” The protection is in effect until June 30, 2022. Check to see if you qualify.

D Columbia Eviction Moratorium

The utility shut-off moratorium has been extended for some customers. In addition to the utility moratorium extension in Washington, D.C., there is currently a ban on evictions for renters who owe less than $600.

Massachusetts Eviction Moratorium

There is no eviction moratorium in place for the state of Massachusetts. However, local cities and towns may have their own eviction moratorium.

Minnesota Eviction Moratorium

Extended through June 1, 2022

New Jersey Eviction Moratorium

Currently, New Jersey residents can be evicted for money owed during the pandemic.

However, you are permanently protected from eviction if you make less than 120% (and in certain cases 80%) of the area median income of your county.

Additionally, you must have debt for rent that was due between March 1, 2020, and August 31, 2021.

New Mexico Eviction Moratorium

New Mexico is gradually phasing out its Covid-19 eviction moratorium between April and July 2022 in four phases.

New York Eviction Moratorium

The eviction moratorium has expired in New York. However, any renter who has an application for rent relief pending in the state of New York cannot be evicted.

  • New York City: On January 15th, 2022, eviction protection for New York City residents ended, including for those who filed a Hardship Declaration. However, protections still apply to New York City residents if their Hardship Declaration is still processing.

Read more:New York Eviction Notice Filings Surge After Protections End

Washington Eviction Moratorium

The state of Washington no longer has an active eviction moratorium for COVID relief.

However, in Seattle, some protections remain in place for those who have children until June 17th. There are also protections for those who could not pay rent due to financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Eviction Moratorium FAQs

If you’re still unsure of some of the details about the current eviction moratoriums in place right now, our FAQs below will explain more about what to expect.

  • How Do I Know if I Am Covered by the Moratorium?

    Generally, you are protected by eviction moratoriums if you comply with a few set criteria. These depend on the state you are living in.

    Under the previous CDC federal moratorium, renters were protected if:

    • They did not expect to earn more than $99,000 this year ($198,000 for joint filing married couples), did not report income to the Federal government in 2019, or have received an economic impact payment this year.
    • They experienced a “substantial” loss of income due to layoff or reduced work hours.
    • They used their “best efforts” to gain rental assistance from the government.
    • They made their best efforts to pay partial rental payments as close to the due amount.
    • The eviction will cause the individual to become homeless or move in with family.

  • Do I Have to Keep Paying Rent?

    Yes, under an eviction moratorium it is necessary to keep up rental payments, even if they are only cover a partial amount of the whole sum due. This kind of moratorium does not cancel rent, late fees, or penalties.

    The moratorium is only a pause on evictions for certain causes such as non-payment. However, if you are still sufficiently in arrears once the ban has ended, your landlord can legally evict you.

  • What Bills Should I Pay if I Can’t Afford All My Expenses?

    If you’re in a situation where you can’t pay all your expenses, it’s important to prioritize essentials such as food, housing, and utilities; if you are obliged to cover these costs in your lease.

    You should try to talk to the companies you owe payment to see if you can pause any of the costs due, at least temporarily, or set up a payment plan.

    It is, however, important to try and show that you are making your best efforts to pay as much as possible despite your financial struggles.

  • What Are My Rights As a Renter?

    Under an active eviction moratorium, you cannot be evicted from your home by your landlord for non-payment.

    This is the case even if eviction proceedings were started against you but not completed when the moratorium came into effect.

    It is also important to note that when these eviction bans end your rental rights return to what they were before the CDC federal eviction moratorium or any state eviction moratoriums were in place.

    At the time that the moratoriums end, landlords can start or continue with eviction proceedings as normal in most cases.

Due to repeated pandemic shutdowns, many citizens across the United States continue to struggle financially. This has led to a large number of tenants being unable to pay their rent fees, thus putting them in danger of eviction.

To help minimize the impact of COVID-19 on tenants, the federal government alongside various counties and states have enacted measures placing moratoriums on evictions and banning utility shutoffs.

Keep reading to learn about the specific tenant protections in your state, as well as how eviction protection regulations have changed over time.

What Is a Federal Eviction Moratorium?

A federal eviction moratorium is a ban on evictions put in place by the federal government.

This means, in most cases, landlords could not evict tenants for unpaid rent throughout the United States.

Normally, it is up to each state to decide its own eviction laws,

However, due to the national emergency brought on by the pandemic, the federal government put this moratorium into effect.

On August 26, 2021, the Supreme Court ruled to end the federal eviction moratorium. All decisions regarding bans on evictions are now being decided at the state and local levels.

Eviction Moratorium Timeline

During the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. various eviction moratoriums were established in response to mass job loss and unemployment. The first of these was included in the CARES act, applying to federally-backed properties.

After its expiry on July 24, 2020, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an agency order known as “Temporary Halt in Residential Evictions to Prevent the Further Spread of Covid-19”.

This order was effective from September 4 until December 31 of 2020, during which evictions were banned in any jurisdiction where the order was applied and for all residential properties in which the tenant met certain criteria.

After the end of the moratorium on the night of January 1 2021, it was immediately extended to January 31. Following President Biden’s inauguration, the order was again extended until March 31.

These federal eviction protections were then extended by the CDC through to June 30, 2021, and one additional extension was enacted until July 31, 2021. Although this was originally meant to be the final moratorium, due to significant political pressure the CDC issued an additional extension for counties with considerable community levels of COVID-19 transmission.

This current ban on evictions will end on October 3 2021, and while additional nationwide bans have not yet been announced, further state and local tenant protections may be issued depending on location.

Who Does the Moratorium Protect?

The current eviction agency order enacted on August 3, 2021 only prohibits landlords from evicting tenants that meet certain criteria. It also only applies to counties with “substantial” or “high” community transmission rates of COVID-19. To check if your county fulfills this requirement, consult the CDC COVID-19 Integrated County View page.

To qualify for protection from eviction, a tenant must also meet the following criteria:

  • Have earned less than $99,000 in 2020 or expected to earn lass than this amount in 2021 ($198,000 if filing jointly with another person)
  • Not have had to report any income to the IRS in 2020 or have received an Economic Impact Payment (stimulus check)
  • Have used their best efforts to obtain government housing assistance
  • Are not able to pay their rent due to significant income loss
  • Have made their best efforts to make partial rent payments
  • Would become homeless or have to move into shared living after eviction

Tenants wanting protection from eviction will need to complete a declaration under penalty of perjury that they meet the order’s criteria. Anyone violating the order may face criminal penalties such as jail time or fines.

It’s also important to note that certain states have additional tenant eviction bans that provide more protection than the current agency order. Make sure you check your area's regulations to see if you fulfill the necessary requirements.


Create a Eviction Notice Now

Eviction Protection Status for All States

The overview below includes the latest information on COVID-19 eviction protections by state. Please be advised that this information is changing frequently (sometimes on an hourly basis), so it’s important that you check your state’s government website regularly for up-to-date information on evictions.

State Ban On Evictions Ban on Utility Shutoffs
Alabama No No
Alaska No No
Arizona No No
Arkansas No No
California Yes No
Colorado No No
Connecticut No No
Delaware No No
District of Columbia Yes Yes
Florida No No
Georgia No No
Hawaii No No
Idaho No No
Illinois No No
Indiana No No
Iowa No No
Kansas No No
Kentucky No No
Louisiana No No
Maine No No
Maryland No No
Massachusetts No [3] No
Michigan No No
Minnesota No No
Mississippi No No
Missouri No No
Montana No No
Nebraska No No
Nevada No No
New Hampshire No No
New Jersey No [5] No
New Mexico Yes [6] No
New York No [7] No
North Carolina No No
North Dakota No No
Ohio No No
Oklahoma No No
Oregon No No
Pennsylvania No No
Rhode Island No No
South Carolina No No
South Dakota No No
Tennessee No No
Texas No [8] No
Utah No No
Vermont No No
Virginia No No
Washington No [9] No
West Virginia No No
Wisconsin No No
Wyoming No No

Update: June 14,, 2022

California Eviction Moratorium

The eviction moratorium has been extended through June 30, 2022, to tenants earning less than 80% of the area median income if they submitted a completed application for rental relief before March 31, 2022. Since April 1, 2022, all renters must pay their rent and utilities.

Check your city or county to see if they have special dispositions in place. Some examples include:

  • Los Angeles: Some tenants have untilt May 2023 to pay back rent that is owed to their landlords. This means there is still an eviction ban until that time for those who qualify.
  • San Francisco: Renters who have a pending application for the California COVID-19 Rent Relief Program may not be evicted until June 30, 2022.
  • San Diego: The city council voted to approve a new eviction moratorium, called the “No-fault Eviction Moratorium” The protection is in effect until June 30, 2022. Check to see if you qualify.

D Columbia Eviction Moratorium

The utility shut-off moratorium has been extended for some customers. In addition to the utility moratorium extension in Washington, D.C., there is currently a ban on evictions for renters who owe less than $600.

Massachusetts Eviction Moratorium

There is no eviction moratorium in place for the state of Massachusetts. However, local cities and towns may have their own eviction moratorium.

Minnesota Eviction Moratorium

Extended through June 1, 2022

New Jersey Eviction Moratorium

Currently, New Jersey residents can be evicted for money owed during the pandemic.

However, you are permanently protected from eviction if you make less than 120% (and in certain cases 80%) of the area median income of your county.

Additionally, you must have debt for rent that was due between March 1, 2020, and August 31, 2021.

New Mexico Eviction Moratorium

New Mexico is gradually phasing out its Covid-19 eviction moratorium between April and July 2022 in four phases.

New York Eviction Moratorium

The eviction moratorium has expired in New York. However, any renter who has an application for rent relief pending in the state of New York cannot be evicted.

  • New York City: On January 15th, 2022, eviction protection for New York City residents ended, including for those who filed a Hardship Declaration. However, protections still apply to New York City residents if their Hardship Declaration is still processing.

Read more:New York Eviction Notice Filings Surge After Protections End

Washington Eviction Moratorium

The state of Washington no longer has an active eviction moratorium for COVID relief.

However, in Seattle, some protections remain in place for those who have children until June 17th. There are also protections for those who could not pay rent due to financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Eviction Moratorium FAQs

If you’re still unsure of some of the details about the current eviction moratoriums in place right now, our FAQs below will explain more about what to expect.

  • How Do I Know if I Am Covered by the Moratorium?

    Generally, you are protected by eviction moratoriums if you comply with a few set criteria. These depend on the state you are living in.

    Under the previous CDC federal moratorium, renters were protected if:

    • They did not expect to earn more than $99,000 this year ($198,000 for joint filing married couples), did not report income to the Federal government in 2019, or have received an economic impact payment this year.
    • They experienced a “substantial” loss of income due to layoff or reduced work hours.
    • They used their “best efforts” to gain rental assistance from the government.
    • They made their best efforts to pay partial rental payments as close to the due amount.
    • The eviction will cause the individual to become homeless or move in with family.

  • Do I Have to Keep Paying Rent?

    Yes, under an eviction moratorium it is necessary to keep up rental payments, even if they are only cover a partial amount of the whole sum due. This kind of moratorium does not cancel rent, late fees, or penalties.

    The moratorium is only a pause on evictions for certain causes such as non-payment. However, if you are still sufficiently in arrears once the ban has ended, your landlord can legally evict you.

  • What Bills Should I Pay if I Can’t Afford All My Expenses?

    If you’re in a situation where you can’t pay all your expenses, it’s important to prioritize essentials such as food, housing, and utilities; if you are obliged to cover these costs in your lease.

    You should try to talk to the companies you owe payment to see if you can pause any of the costs due, at least temporarily, or set up a payment plan.

    It is, however, important to try and show that you are making your best efforts to pay as much as possible despite your financial struggles.

  • What Are My Rights As a Renter?

    Under an active eviction moratorium, you cannot be evicted from your home by your landlord for non-payment.

    This is the case even if eviction proceedings were started against you but not completed when the moratorium came into effect.

    It is also important to note that when these eviction bans end your rental rights return to what they were before the CDC federal eviction moratorium or any state eviction moratoriums were in place.

    At the time that the moratoriums end, landlords can start or continue with eviction proceedings as normal in most cases.