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Since the start of 2022, New York has begun to return to normal after a long pandemic. Across the state, public spaces are re-opening and life looks like it did before 2022.

This applies to Evictions as well. There has been an Eviction Notice rise over the past few months.

This is due to the Eviction Moratorium ending in New York, just as in the rest of the United States.

That doesn’t mean it has always been easy for landlords to proceed with evictions.

New York State still offers protection for anyone with financial problems because of the pandemic.

Why New York Eviction Filings Have Increased in 2022

New York City has some of the strictest rules and protections in the country that help tenants avoid eviction.

That has not stopped eviction filings to stop growing over the first half of 2022.

The main reason for this increase is the end of the nationwide eviction moratorium.

Data from Evictionlab shows the growth in eviction filings in New York and what communities are being affected most. There are increases in:

  • Amount of eviction filings
  • Amount of money claimed by the landlord
  • Filings in Latinx and black neighborhoods

Eviction filings at the moment are low compared to historical averages. There has still been a surge lately. Around a 40% increase in filings has taken place between November 2021 and April 2022.

Since the end of the eviction moratorium, landlords have fewer restrictions in the way of evicting a tenant.

A Major Reason for Evictions: Unpaid Rent

Unpaid rent is the most common reason eviction notices are filed across the United States.

In the state of New York, 17.6% of renters have rent that is due.

In New York City, within the Latinx and Black communities, 32% of Latinx renters and 30% of black renters owed rent or anticipated to owe rent in 2021.

Many landlords across the state of New York and New York City submit eviction notices in hopes of solving any problem they have regarding back rent.

If the tenant does not comply, eviction proceedings can begin in the local housing courts.

New York Eviction Protections

Neither New York State nor New York is no longer accepting certain economic help applications.

There is no longer an eviction ban on renters who applied for a hardship declaration. This law ended on January 15th, 2022.

The ERAP has also stopped accepting applications before the 31st of March, 2022.

However, if an application was submitted before those dates, renters may still be offered protection.

If a tenant can demonstrate they were financially unable to pay rent due to the pandemic, they won’t be evicted.

This is possible due to the following aid in place for those who have already applied:

  • Tenant Safe Harbor Act: A renter must show in court how their financial problems, caused by the pandemic, prevented them from paying rent. The period of financial hardship must have been from March 2020 until January 2022.
  • Emergency Rental Assistance Program (ERAP): Any tenant with financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic can apply. The program helps these renters pay past-due rent.

New York is still reviewing applications for these programs. If a renter is eligible for assistance, it can prevent an eviction.

New York Eviction Notice Types

In New York, there must be a demonstrable and legal reason to be able to evict a tenant.

If a landlord does not present the correct documentation, then the case may be dismissed.

There are different types of eviction notices in New York. The amount of notice given depends on the reason for the possible eviction.

In New York State, these are the 3 different notices to quit.

  • 14-Day Eviction Notice
  • 30-Day Eviction Notice
  • Month-to-month Eviction Notice

These legal documents serve as a warning for tenants to correct a breach of contract. If a tenant does not comply with the notice, eviction proceedings can begin.

However, If the wrong amount of notice is given, then the case can be thrown out.

Real estate attorneys in New York understand how these eviction notices work. While it may be expensive, they can explain anything you need to know.

On LawDistrict there is plenty of information regarding the eviction process. There are also free legal templates available to download.

14-Day Eviction Notice in New York

A notice of 14 days can be given to tenants that have unpaid rent. During the next 14 days after the notice is served, the amount of rent due must be paid back.

If a tenant does not pay the owed amount, then the landlord can file for eviction in court.

If the eviction is approved, the tenant must leave the property.

30-Day Eviction Notice in New York

For a breach of contract apart from unpaid rent, a landlord must give 30 days' notice. For any violations such as:

  • Illegal activity
  • Damage to the property
  • Unauthorized pets

Most of these violations are curable, meaning they can be fixed. However, some violations cannot if they are too severe.

30-Day Month-to-Month Notice to Quit

A 30-Day Eviction Notice may not have to do with a breach of contract or unpaid rent. A rental agreement may end simply because a party wants the agreement to end.

In New York, 30 days' notice must be given to end a rental agreement if it doesn’t have a fixed lease.

Ending a month-to-month tenancy does not count as an eviction.

This type of notice does not end up on a renters record, and in most cases, this is enough time for a tenant to find another residence.

A tenant may be removed by law enforcement if they do not leave the property 30 days after the notice is served.


Start a New York Eviction Notice

Since the start of 2022, New York has begun to return to normal after a long pandemic. Across the state, public spaces are re-opening and life looks like it did before 2022.

This applies to Evictions as well. There has been an Eviction Notice rise over the past few months.

This is due to the Eviction Moratorium ending in New York, just as in the rest of the United States.

That doesn’t mean it has always been easy for landlords to proceed with evictions.

New York State still offers protection for anyone with financial problems because of the pandemic.

Why New York Eviction Filings Have Increased in 2022

New York City has some of the strictest rules and protections in the country that help tenants avoid eviction.

That has not stopped eviction filings to stop growing over the first half of 2022.

The main reason for this increase is the end of the nationwide eviction moratorium.

Data from Evictionlab shows the growth in eviction filings in New York and what communities are being affected most. There are increases in:

  • Amount of eviction filings
  • Amount of money claimed by the landlord
  • Filings in Latinx and black neighborhoods

Eviction filings at the moment are low compared to historical averages. There has still been a surge lately. Around a 40% increase in filings has taken place between November 2021 and April 2022.

Since the end of the eviction moratorium, landlords have fewer restrictions in the way of evicting a tenant.

A Major Reason for Evictions: Unpaid Rent

Unpaid rent is the most common reason eviction notices are filed across the United States.

In the state of New York, 17.6% of renters have rent that is due.

In New York City, within the Latinx and Black communities, 32% of Latinx renters and 30% of black renters owed rent or anticipated to owe rent in 2021.

Many landlords across the state of New York and New York City submit eviction notices in hopes of solving any problem they have regarding back rent.

If the tenant does not comply, eviction proceedings can begin in the local housing courts.

New York Eviction Protections

Neither New York State nor New York is no longer accepting certain economic help applications.

There is no longer an eviction ban on renters who applied for a hardship declaration. This law ended on January 15th, 2022.

The ERAP has also stopped accepting applications before the 31st of March, 2022.

However, if an application was submitted before those dates, renters may still be offered protection.

If a tenant can demonstrate they were financially unable to pay rent due to the pandemic, they won’t be evicted.

This is possible due to the following aid in place for those who have already applied:

  • Tenant Safe Harbor Act: A renter must show in court how their financial problems, caused by the pandemic, prevented them from paying rent. The period of financial hardship must have been from March 2020 until January 2022.
  • Emergency Rental Assistance Program (ERAP): Any tenant with financial hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic can apply. The program helps these renters pay past-due rent.

New York is still reviewing applications for these programs. If a renter is eligible for assistance, it can prevent an eviction.

New York Eviction Notice Types

In New York, there must be a demonstrable and legal reason to be able to evict a tenant.

If a landlord does not present the correct documentation, then the case may be dismissed.

There are different types of eviction notices in New York. The amount of notice given depends on the reason for the possible eviction.

In New York State, these are the 3 different notices to quit.

  • 14-Day Eviction Notice
  • 30-Day Eviction Notice
  • Month-to-month Eviction Notice

These legal documents serve as a warning for tenants to correct a breach of contract. If a tenant does not comply with the notice, eviction proceedings can begin.

However, If the wrong amount of notice is given, then the case can be thrown out.

Real estate attorneys in New York understand how these eviction notices work. While it may be expensive, they can explain anything you need to know.

On LawDistrict there is plenty of information regarding the eviction process. There are also free legal templates available to download.

14-Day Eviction Notice in New York

A notice of 14 days can be given to tenants that have unpaid rent. During the next 14 days after the notice is served, the amount of rent due must be paid back.

If a tenant does not pay the owed amount, then the landlord can file for eviction in court.

If the eviction is approved, the tenant must leave the property.

30-Day Eviction Notice in New York

For a breach of contract apart from unpaid rent, a landlord must give 30 days' notice. For any violations such as:

  • Illegal activity
  • Damage to the property
  • Unauthorized pets

Most of these violations are curable, meaning they can be fixed. However, some violations cannot if they are too severe.

30-Day Month-to-Month Notice to Quit

A 30-Day Eviction Notice may not have to do with a breach of contract or unpaid rent. A rental agreement may end simply because a party wants the agreement to end.

In New York, 30 days' notice must be given to end a rental agreement if it doesn’t have a fixed lease.

Ending a month-to-month tenancy does not count as an eviction.

This type of notice does not end up on a renters record, and in most cases, this is enough time for a tenant to find another residence.

A tenant may be removed by law enforcement if they do not leave the property 30 days after the notice is served.


Start a New York Eviction Notice