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At one point or another, a lease agreement will come to an end between a landlord and a tenant. There are various reasons this may happen.

You may feel you have no choice but to terminate the agreement due to the tenant’s behavior.

If the tenant has committed a breach of contract, you may have the right to end their stay on your property.

If it is for a violation of the agreement, it is best to use an eviction notice. This allows you to warn your tenant to stop their breach of contract, or they face the termination of their tenancy.

However, a landlord or tenant can simply wish to no longer renew the lease agreement and cordially terminate the tenancy when the contract ends.

In that case, you must send a Notice to Vacate Letter.

This article provides the information needed to write your Notice to Vacate Letter correctly.

Failure to send your notice or providing one too late or written incorrectly can result in unsuccessful lease termination.

Review the following guide, as well as the sample Notice to Vacate Letter, that will ensure you create a legal document that provides adequate notice and a clear understanding for both parties.

Notice requirements are governed by landlord-tenant law in addition to your lease. Each state may have its own requirements, and the timeframe can change based on your lease term. Ensure you comply with your local laws when providing a notice to vacate letter.

What Is a Notice To Vacate Letter?

A Notice to Vacate Letter is a legal document given from one party of a lease agreement to another, advising them that the premises will be vacated once the contract is over.

It is the legal right of both the tenant and landlord to have sufficient notice that the other party is ending the agreement.

For landlords, this can also be known as a lease termination letter. You are giving your tenant sufficient notice that you are ending the lease agreement when the contract expires.

The amount of days’ notice is determined by the laws of the state.

This is not to be confused with an eviction notice. This type of notice is sent primarily when there is a breach of contract and may result in a court-ordered removal from the premises.

Tenants can also send a Notice to Vacate Letter to their landlord when planning to end a lease agreement (usually month-to-month).

Read more:Notice to Vacate vs. Eviction Notice

Tenant to Landlord Vacate Letter

As a tenant, if you wish to terminate your lease agreement, you’ll need to provide a Notice to Vacate Letter to your landlord.

In most cases, you must provide 30 days' notice. However, some states require more or less time.

In your letter, it is essential to include:

  • What day you will vacate
  • Forwarding address
  • Where to send the deposit

Landlord to Tenant Vacate Letter

As a landlord, you must send a Notice to Vacate whether you are ending a short-term or long-term lease agreement.

This also includes any agreement made without a contract.

It is essential to check your state’s laws to know the amount of notice you must give your tenant.

When making your letter, remember to include the following details:

  • Move-out date
  • Day the final rent is due
  • What fixtures must remain with the property
  • Instructions regarding returning property to the pre-rental state

Guide to Writing a Notice to Vacate Letter

To create a legitimate and legal document, as a landlord, you must include the following elements in your Notice to Vacate Letter:

  • Rental property address
  • Name of the tenant(s)
  • Day when the tenant must vacate the property
  • Why the lease is ending, if applicable
  • Information regarding the move-out process
  • Landlord contact information

Without this information, your tenant may be able to argue he or she did not receive adequate notice.

It is necessary to gather all the details and then correctly add them to the letter in the correct manner.

Complete the following steps to correctly create your Notice to Vacate Letter.

Include the Information of Both Parties

You must include the details of both parties. This information includes:

  • Address of the property
  • Tenancy period
  • Both the tenant and landlord’s names
  • Contact information.

Adding this information ensures there will be no confusion concerning the identities of each party or the location of the property.

Give the Reason for Termination

Offer the other party an explanation as to why the lease is being terminated.

For example, selling the property or a breach of contract could be reasons for termination of the agreement.

Providing a reason is especially important when ending a long-term lease early and not just a month-to-month lease.

Add the Move-Out Date

Add a date the tenant must leave the property. In this section, you must also include

  • Move out date
  • Inspection date and time
  • Security deposit information

Ensure there is enough notice, according to the laws of your state, given before the tenant must leave.

It is important to communicate with your tenant regarding these matters and to be clear.

Set up a time you are both available for the inspection of the property and provide all necessary information regarding the deposit.

Sign the Document

At the end of the letter, you must write:

  • Your name
  • Address
  • Date
  • Signature

Make sure to complete all of these required steps.

The date you create and deliver the document must be with enough notice to the tenant to vacate.

It is also always a good idea to make your contact information available.

Be open to answering any questions or concerns the tenant may have throughout the process.

To avoid any penalties or problems, draft a formal notice to vacate letter with plenty of time before any deadlines. A well-drafted notice to vacate letter can clarify when the lease ends, the expectations of each party, and how to pay any leftover amounts, whether rent or security deposits.

The easy contract maker tool on LawDistrict.com has all the resources you need to write a notice to vacate letter tailored to your circumstances. Check out our step-by-step guides today!

At one point or another, a lease agreement will come to an end between a landlord and a tenant. There are various reasons this may happen.

You may feel you have no choice but to terminate the agreement due to the tenant’s behavior.

If the tenant has committed a breach of contract, you may have the right to end their stay on your property.

If it is for a violation of the agreement, it is best to use an eviction notice. This allows you to warn your tenant to stop their breach of contract, or they face the termination of their tenancy.

However, a landlord or tenant can simply wish to no longer renew the lease agreement and cordially terminate the tenancy when the contract ends.

In that case, you must send a Notice to Vacate Letter.

This article provides the information needed to write your Notice to Vacate Letter correctly.

Failure to send your notice or providing one too late or written incorrectly can result in unsuccessful lease termination.

Review the following guide, as well as the sample Notice to Vacate Letter, that will ensure you create a legal document that provides adequate notice and a clear understanding for both parties.

Notice requirements are governed by landlord-tenant law in addition to your lease. Each state may have its own requirements, and the timeframe can change based on your lease term. Ensure you comply with your local laws when providing a notice to vacate letter.

What Is a Notice To Vacate Letter?

A Notice to Vacate Letter is a legal document given from one party of a lease agreement to another, advising them that the premises will be vacated once the contract is over.

It is the legal right of both the tenant and landlord to have sufficient notice that the other party is ending the agreement.

For landlords, this can also be known as a lease termination letter. You are giving your tenant sufficient notice that you are ending the lease agreement when the contract expires.

The amount of days’ notice is determined by the laws of the state.

This is not to be confused with an eviction notice. This type of notice is sent primarily when there is a breach of contract and may result in a court-ordered removal from the premises.

Tenants can also send a Notice to Vacate Letter to their landlord when planning to end a lease agreement (usually month-to-month).

Read more:Notice to Vacate vs. Eviction Notice

Tenant to Landlord Vacate Letter

As a tenant, if you wish to terminate your lease agreement, you’ll need to provide a Notice to Vacate Letter to your landlord.

In most cases, you must provide 30 days' notice. However, some states require more or less time.

In your letter, it is essential to include:

  • What day you will vacate
  • Forwarding address
  • Where to send the deposit

Landlord to Tenant Vacate Letter

As a landlord, you must send a Notice to Vacate whether you are ending a short-term or long-term lease agreement.

This also includes any agreement made without a contract.

It is essential to check your state’s laws to know the amount of notice you must give your tenant.

When making your letter, remember to include the following details:

  • Move-out date
  • Day the final rent is due
  • What fixtures must remain with the property
  • Instructions regarding returning property to the pre-rental state

Guide to Writing a Notice to Vacate Letter

To create a legitimate and legal document, as a landlord, you must include the following elements in your Notice to Vacate Letter:

  • Rental property address
  • Name of the tenant(s)
  • Day when the tenant must vacate the property
  • Why the lease is ending, if applicable
  • Information regarding the move-out process
  • Landlord contact information

Without this information, your tenant may be able to argue he or she did not receive adequate notice.

It is necessary to gather all the details and then correctly add them to the letter in the correct manner.

Complete the following steps to correctly create your Notice to Vacate Letter.

Include the Information of Both Parties

You must include the details of both parties. This information includes:

  • Address of the property
  • Tenancy period
  • Both the tenant and landlord’s names
  • Contact information.

Adding this information ensures there will be no confusion concerning the identities of each party or the location of the property.

Give the Reason for Termination

Offer the other party an explanation as to why the lease is being terminated.

For example, selling the property or a breach of contract could be reasons for termination of the agreement.

Providing a reason is especially important when ending a long-term lease early and not just a month-to-month lease.

Add the Move-Out Date

Add a date the tenant must leave the property. In this section, you must also include

  • Move out date
  • Inspection date and time
  • Security deposit information

Ensure there is enough notice, according to the laws of your state, given before the tenant must leave.

It is important to communicate with your tenant regarding these matters and to be clear.

Set up a time you are both available for the inspection of the property and provide all necessary information regarding the deposit.

Sign the Document

At the end of the letter, you must write:

  • Your name
  • Address
  • Date
  • Signature

Make sure to complete all of these required steps.

The date you create and deliver the document must be with enough notice to the tenant to vacate.

It is also always a good idea to make your contact information available.

Be open to answering any questions or concerns the tenant may have throughout the process.

To avoid any penalties or problems, draft a formal notice to vacate letter with plenty of time before any deadlines. A well-drafted notice to vacate letter can clarify when the lease ends, the expectations of each party, and how to pay any leftover amounts, whether rent or security deposits.

The easy contract maker tool on LawDistrict.com has all the resources you need to write a notice to vacate letter tailored to your circumstances. Check out our step-by-step guides today!