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Whether you are a property owner seeking renters or someone looking for a new home to rent, laws exist to safeguard your right's. In the U.S., landlords and tenants must each comply with a set of federal regulations and state laws that vary according to where the property is located.

Before you prepare or sign a lease, it’s essential that you know and understand your legal rights. This article will equip you with the basics for what you need to know about landlord tenant law.

What is the Landlord Tenant Law?

Composed mainly of state statutes and common law, landlord tenant law covers the rental of residential and commercial property. Their purpose is to make the rental process fair and safe for landlords and tenants alike.

Although all states must comply with some federal regulations, such as anti-discrimination laws, each state has its own set of landlord tenant laws.

For example, states may vary on anything from the information requirements for a rental listing to what information is needed for the tenant screening process. Therefore, it is critical to know the laws that govern your state before you enter into a lease agreement.

The Lease Agreement

It is the landlord’s legal responsibility to provide a written rental contract that follows all federal and state regulations. Some states recognize verbal agreements but only for a period of one year or less.

A lease agreement is a legal document, and here is a list of information a typical lease agreement includes:

  • Full legal names of the landlord and tenant(s)
  • Address and description of the rental property
  • Length of time agreement covers
  • Rental payment amount and date it is due each month
  • Security deposit amount and details on what it covers how its return might be waived
  • Pet policy

Keep in mind that the term “lease agreement” typically is reserved for rental contracts of one year or more. A short-term lease agreement – such as one for 30 days – is usually called a "rental agreement."

Tenant Rights

The Fair Housing Act, enacted as part of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, prohibits discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, familial status, and disability. Some state landlord tenant laws also include protections on the basis of marital status or LGBT identity as part of their fair housing law. Some states also have an addendum that landlords with a no pets policy must rent to a tenant who requires a support animal.

Other tenant rights that are commonly included in a lease agreement are:

  • The right to living undisturbed
  • The right to livable conditions
  • The right to privacy (For example, the landlord may not enter the home unannounced.)

Landlord Rights

Landlord tenant laws also protect the property owner, especially when it comes to safeguarding their investment in the property itself. Although once again state laws and common law can vary when it comes to landlord rights, they generally include:

  • The right to screen applicants
  • The right to collecting deposits and payments, including those associated with pets, parking, or extra amenities
  • The right to enter the home with notice (or without notice due to an emergency)
  • The right to use the security deposit toward unpaid rent to make repairs
  • The right to evicting tenants if terms of the lease agreement are not met

Background Check

In order to protect their investment in their property, landlords seek tenants who have a responsible financial history. With a background check, a landlord can verify the information a prospective tenant includes on the rental application.

Here is a list of tenant information a background check seeks or confirms

  • Social Security number
  • Driver's license number
  • Recent employment history
  • Current income
  • Previous landlords
  • Past evictions
  • Past bankruptcies
  • Felony convictions

As part of this process, a landlord typically contacts previous landlords or other references to see if any problems occurred in the past. The landlord also runs a credit report to verify the prospective tenant’s financial information.

Security Deposit Law

A security deposit is an amount of money above and beyond the rent that is used as a way to ensure that any damage the tenant might cause to the property will be covered.

It is typical practice for a lease agreement to require the first and last month’s rent as well as an additional security deposit. Although state laws vary, a security deposit usually is not an amount greater than one month’s rent.

In many states, the landlord must issue the tenant a receipt for a security deposit. The receipt should include the following information:

  • The names and signatures of the parties involved
  • The amount of the security deposit
  • The date the payment was received
  • The intended use of the security deposit
  • The terms by which the deposit will be refunded and how it will be refunded

Additionally, the receipt should include the terms of how any interest earned on the deposit will be paid.

Lease Termination

In legal terms, violating a lease agreement is considered a breach of contract. Most states allow a landlord to terminate a lease agreement if the tenant does the following:

  • Fails to make rent payment(s)
  • Violates another part of the lease agreement
  • Violates the law in other ways

When terminating an agreement, the landlord must send the tenant a notice of termination in the form of a lease termination letter to the tenant. Although each state’s laws may differ somewhat, a lease termination letter usually includes one of the following terms:

  • The tenant must pay the past-due rent within a set period (usually three to five days) or vacate the property.
  • The tenant must correct the specified violation of the lease agreement within a set timeframe or vacate the property.
  • The tenant must vacate the property without the opportunity to correct the violation or pay the back rent.

If the tenant remains in the rental property after receiving a lease termination notice, a landlord may take the next step -- filing an eviction lawsuit.

Eviction Law

There are two types of evictions -- constructive eviction and actual eviction. In a constructive eviction, the landlord has not provided the agreed-upon services, allowing the tenant to legally cancel the lease.

In an actual eviction, it is the tenant who is violating the terms of the lease agreement, and the landlord takes legal action to remove a tenant from the rental property. In most cases, a landlord can evict a tenant for the following:

  • failure to pay rent
  • failure to vacate the property after a lease agreement expires
  • violation of a provision in the rental contract
  • damage to the property that substantially decreases its value

However, every state has different laws that govern the steps a landlord may take during the eviction process. For example, most states require a landlord issue a written eviction notice to a tenant before filing a lawsuit. And most states have laws regarding squatters’ rights (also known as adverse possession).

Contact your lawyer for more details if you have questions on the legal filing of an eviction notice.

Landlord Tenant Law by States

As we have discussed, each state (and the District of Columbia) has its own set of landlord tenant laws. You can search for your state’s set of rules.

Here is a listing of the state codes and statutes that govern landlord tenant law.

State Tenant Law
Alabama Ala. Code §§ 35-9-1 to 35-9-100; 35-9A-101 to 35-9A-603 (Title 35, Chapter 9)
Alaska Alaska Stat. §§ 34.03.010 to 34.03.380 (Title 34, Chapter 34.03)
Arizona Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 12-1171 to 12-1183; §§ 33-1301 to 33-1381; 33-301 to 33-381 (Title 33, Chapter 3)
Arkansas Ark. Code Ann. §§ 18-16-101 to 18-16-306; 18-16-501 to 18-16-509; 18-17-101 to 18-17-913 (Title 18, Subtitle 2, Chapter 16)
California Cal. Civ. Code §§ 1925 to 1954; 1961 to 1997.270
Colorado Colo. Rev. Stat. §§ 38-12-101 to 38-12-104; 38-12-301 to 38-12-511; 13-40-101 to 13-40-123 (Title 38, Article 12, Part I and Part III)
Connecticut Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §§ 47a-1 to 47a-74 (Title 47a)
Delaware Del. Code Ann. tit. 25, §§ 5101 to 5907 (Title 25, Chapters 51-59)
Florida Fla. Stat. Ann. §§ 83.40 to 83.682
Georgia Ga. Code Ann. §§ 44-7-1 to 44-7-81 (Title 44, Chapter 7)
Hawaii Haw. Rev. Stat. §§ 521-1 to 521-78 (Chapter 521)
Idaho Code §§ 6-201 to 6-324; §§ 55-208 to 55-308 (Title 55, Chapter 2 and Chapter 3, §§ 208-308, Title 6, Chapter 2 and Chapter 3)
Illinois Ill. Com. Stat. §§ 5/9-201 to 321 & 765 Ill. Comp. Stat. §§ 705/0.01 to 742/30 (Chapter 765 Sections 705 to 750)
Indiana Ind. Code Ann. §§ 32-31-1-1 to 32-31-9-15 (Title 32, Article 31)
Iowa Iowa Code Ann. §§ 562A.1 to 562A.37 (Title XIV, Subtitle 2, Chapter 562)
Kansas Kan. Stat. Ann. §§ 58-2501 to 58-2573 (Chapter 58, Article 25, §§ 2501-2573)
Kentucky Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 383.010 to 383.715 (Title XXXII, Chapter 383)
Louisiana La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 9:3251 to 9:3261; La. Civ. Code Ann. art. 2668 to 2729 (RS 9:3201 to 9:3341)
Maine Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 14, §§ 6001 to 6046 (Title 14, Part 7, Chapter 709, Subchapter 1)
Maryland Md. Code Ann. [Real Prop.] §§ 8-101 to 8-604 (Real Property, Article, Title 8)
Massachusetts Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 186, §§ 1 to 22 (Part II, Title I, Chapter 186)
Michigan Mich. Comp. Laws §§ 554.131 to .201; 554.601 to 554.641 (Chapter 554, Act 348 of 1972)
Minnesota Minn. Stat. Ann. §§ 504B.001 to 504B.471 (Chapter 504B)
Mississippi Miss. Code Ann. §§ 89-7-1 to 89-8-27 (Title 89, Chapter 7 and Chapter 8)
Missouri Mo. Rev. Stat. §§ 441.005 to 441.880; §§ 535.150 to 535.300 (Chapter 441, Chapter 535, 150-300)
Montana Mont. Code Ann. §§ 70-24-101 to 70-26-110 (Title 70, Chapter 24-Chapter 27)
Nebraska Neb. Rev. Stat. §§ 76-1401 to 76-1449 (Chapter 76)
Nevada Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 118A.010 to 118A.520; 40.215 to 40.280 (Title 10, Chapter 118 and Chapter 118A)
New Hampshire N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 540:1 to 540:29, 540-A:1 to 540-A:8 (

Title LV, Chapter 540, Title LV, Chapter 540-A)

New Jersey N.J. Stat. Ann. §§ 46:8-1 to 46:8-50; 2A:42-1 to 42-96 (Title 46, Chapter 8)
New Mexico N.M. Stat. Ann. §§ 47-8-1 to 47-8-51 (Chapter 47, Article 8)
New York N.Y. Real Prop. Law §§ 220 to 238; Real Prop. Acts §§ 701 to 853; Mult. Dwell. Law (all); Mult. Res. Law (all); Gen. Oblig. Law §§ 7-103 to 7-109 (RPP: Real Property - Article 7: Landlord and Tenant)
North Carolina N.C. Gen. Stat. §§ 42-1 to 42-14.2, 42-25.6 to 42-76 (Chapter 42: Landlord and Tenant)
North Dakota N.D. Cent. Code §§ 47-16-01 to 47-16-41 (Title 47, Chapter 16: Leasing of Real Property)
Ohio Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §§ 5321.01 to 5321.19 (Chapter 5321: Landlords and Tenants)
Oklahoma Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 41, §§ 1 to 136 (Title 41: Landlord and Tenant)
Oregon Or. Rev. Stat. §§ 90.100 to 91.225 (Chapter 90: Residential Landlord and Tenant)
Pennsylvania Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. §§ 250.101; 399.18 (Title 68, Chapter 8: Landlord and Tenant Act of 1951)
Rhode Island R.I. Gen. Laws §§ 34-18-1 to 34-18-57 (Title 34, Chapter 18: Residential Landlord and Tenant Act)
South Carolina S.C. Code Ann. §§ 27-40-10 to 27-40-940 (Title 27, Chapter 40: Residential Landlord and Tenant Act)
South Dakota S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §§ 43-32-1 to 43-32-29 (Chapter 43-32: Lease of Real Property)
Tennessee Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 66-28-101 to 66-28-521 (Title 66, Chapter 28)
Texas Tex. Prop. Code Ann. §§ 91.001 to 92.355 (Title 8, Chapter 91 and Chapter 92)
Utah Utah Code Ann. §§ 57-17-1 to 57-17-5; 57-22-1 to 57-22-6 (Title 57, Chapter 17, Title 57, Chapter 22)
Vermont Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 9, §§ 4451 to 4468 (Title 9, Chapter 137: Residential Rental Agreements)
Virginia Va. Code Ann. §§ 55-218.1 to 55-248.40 (Title 55, Chapters 13.1-13.3)
Washington Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §§ 59.04.010 to 59.04.900; 59.18.010 to 59.18.912 (Section 59.18: Residential Landlord-Tenant Act)
Washington DC D.C. Code Ann. §§ 42-3201 to 42-3610; D.C. Mun. Regs., tit. 14, §§ 300 to 315 (Title 42, Subtitle VII)
West Virginia W.Va. Code §§ 37-6-1 to 37-6-30 (Chapter 37, sections 6-1 to 6-30)
Wisconsin Wis. Stat. Ann. §§ 704.01 to 704.50; Wis. Admin. Code 134.01 to 134.10 (Chapter 704)
Wyoming Wyo. Stat. §§ 1-21-1201 to 1-21-1211; §§ 34-2-128 to 34-2-129 (Title 34, Chapter 2, Title 1, Chapter 21, Article 12)

Summary

Landlord tenant laws exist to protect both parties in a rental agreement. If you have questions about your rights as a landlord or as a renter, it is a good idea to speak with an attorney. You can also find our legal documents to get easily a lease agreement templates or an eviction notice.


All Legal Documents

Helpful Resources:
Landlord Tenant Laws - AAOA
Landlord Tenant Laws - LII
Fair Housing - HUD

Whether you are a property owner seeking renters or someone looking for a new home to rent, laws exist to safeguard your right's. In the U.S., landlords and tenants must each comply with a set of federal regulations and state laws that vary according to where the property is located.

Before you prepare or sign a lease, it’s essential that you know and understand your legal rights. This article will equip you with the basics for what you need to know about landlord tenant law.

What is the Landlord Tenant Law?

Composed mainly of state statutes and common law, landlord tenant law covers the rental of residential and commercial property. Their purpose is to make the rental process fair and safe for landlords and tenants alike.

Although all states must comply with some federal regulations, such as anti-discrimination laws, each state has its own set of landlord tenant laws.

For example, states may vary on anything from the information requirements for a rental listing to what information is needed for the tenant screening process. Therefore, it is critical to know the laws that govern your state before you enter into a lease agreement.

The Lease Agreement

It is the landlord’s legal responsibility to provide a written rental contract that follows all federal and state regulations. Some states recognize verbal agreements but only for a period of one year or less.

A lease agreement is a legal document, and here is a list of information a typical lease agreement includes:

  • Full legal names of the landlord and tenant(s)
  • Address and description of the rental property
  • Length of time agreement covers
  • Rental payment amount and date it is due each month
  • Security deposit amount and details on what it covers how its return might be waived
  • Pet policy

Keep in mind that the term “lease agreement” typically is reserved for rental contracts of one year or more. A short-term lease agreement – such as one for 30 days – is usually called a "rental agreement."

Tenant Rights

The Fair Housing Act, enacted as part of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, prohibits discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, familial status, and disability. Some state landlord tenant laws also include protections on the basis of marital status or LGBT identity as part of their fair housing law. Some states also have an addendum that landlords with a no pets policy must rent to a tenant who requires a support animal.

Other tenant rights that are commonly included in a lease agreement are:

  • The right to living undisturbed
  • The right to livable conditions
  • The right to privacy (For example, the landlord may not enter the home unannounced.)

Landlord Rights

Landlord tenant laws also protect the property owner, especially when it comes to safeguarding their investment in the property itself. Although once again state laws and common law can vary when it comes to landlord rights, they generally include:

  • The right to screen applicants
  • The right to collecting deposits and payments, including those associated with pets, parking, or extra amenities
  • The right to enter the home with notice (or without notice due to an emergency)
  • The right to use the security deposit toward unpaid rent to make repairs
  • The right to evicting tenants if terms of the lease agreement are not met

Background Check

In order to protect their investment in their property, landlords seek tenants who have a responsible financial history. With a background check, a landlord can verify the information a prospective tenant includes on the rental application.

Here is a list of tenant information a background check seeks or confirms

  • Social Security number
  • Driver's license number
  • Recent employment history
  • Current income
  • Previous landlords
  • Past evictions
  • Past bankruptcies
  • Felony convictions

As part of this process, a landlord typically contacts previous landlords or other references to see if any problems occurred in the past. The landlord also runs a credit report to verify the prospective tenant’s financial information.

Security Deposit Law

A security deposit is an amount of money above and beyond the rent that is used as a way to ensure that any damage the tenant might cause to the property will be covered.

It is typical practice for a lease agreement to require the first and last month’s rent as well as an additional security deposit. Although state laws vary, a security deposit usually is not an amount greater than one month’s rent.

In many states, the landlord must issue the tenant a receipt for a security deposit. The receipt should include the following information:

  • The names and signatures of the parties involved
  • The amount of the security deposit
  • The date the payment was received
  • The intended use of the security deposit
  • The terms by which the deposit will be refunded and how it will be refunded

Additionally, the receipt should include the terms of how any interest earned on the deposit will be paid.

Lease Termination

In legal terms, violating a lease agreement is considered a breach of contract. Most states allow a landlord to terminate a lease agreement if the tenant does the following:

  • Fails to make rent payment(s)
  • Violates another part of the lease agreement
  • Violates the law in other ways

When terminating an agreement, the landlord must send the tenant a notice of termination in the form of a lease termination letter to the tenant. Although each state’s laws may differ somewhat, a lease termination letter usually includes one of the following terms:

  • The tenant must pay the past-due rent within a set period (usually three to five days) or vacate the property.
  • The tenant must correct the specified violation of the lease agreement within a set timeframe or vacate the property.
  • The tenant must vacate the property without the opportunity to correct the violation or pay the back rent.

If the tenant remains in the rental property after receiving a lease termination notice, a landlord may take the next step -- filing an eviction lawsuit.

Eviction Law

There are two types of evictions -- constructive eviction and actual eviction. In a constructive eviction, the landlord has not provided the agreed-upon services, allowing the tenant to legally cancel the lease.

In an actual eviction, it is the tenant who is violating the terms of the lease agreement, and the landlord takes legal action to remove a tenant from the rental property. In most cases, a landlord can evict a tenant for the following:

  • failure to pay rent
  • failure to vacate the property after a lease agreement expires
  • violation of a provision in the rental contract
  • damage to the property that substantially decreases its value

However, every state has different laws that govern the steps a landlord may take during the eviction process. For example, most states require a landlord issue a written eviction notice to a tenant before filing a lawsuit. And most states have laws regarding squatters’ rights (also known as adverse possession).

Contact your lawyer for more details if you have questions on the legal filing of an eviction notice.

Landlord Tenant Law by States

As we have discussed, each state (and the District of Columbia) has its own set of landlord tenant laws. You can search for your state’s set of rules.

Here is a listing of the state codes and statutes that govern landlord tenant law.

State Tenant Law
Alabama Ala. Code §§ 35-9-1 to 35-9-100; 35-9A-101 to 35-9A-603 (Title 35, Chapter 9)
Alaska Alaska Stat. §§ 34.03.010 to 34.03.380 (Title 34, Chapter 34.03)
Arizona Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 12-1171 to 12-1183; §§ 33-1301 to 33-1381; 33-301 to 33-381 (Title 33, Chapter 3)
Arkansas Ark. Code Ann. §§ 18-16-101 to 18-16-306; 18-16-501 to 18-16-509; 18-17-101 to 18-17-913 (Title 18, Subtitle 2, Chapter 16)
California Cal. Civ. Code §§ 1925 to 1954; 1961 to 1997.270
Colorado Colo. Rev. Stat. §§ 38-12-101 to 38-12-104; 38-12-301 to 38-12-511; 13-40-101 to 13-40-123 (Title 38, Article 12, Part I and Part III)
Connecticut Conn. Gen. Stat. Ann. §§ 47a-1 to 47a-74 (Title 47a)
Delaware Del. Code Ann. tit. 25, §§ 5101 to 5907 (Title 25, Chapters 51-59)
Florida Fla. Stat. Ann. §§ 83.40 to 83.682
Georgia Ga. Code Ann. §§ 44-7-1 to 44-7-81 (Title 44, Chapter 7)
Hawaii Haw. Rev. Stat. §§ 521-1 to 521-78 (Chapter 521)
Idaho Code §§ 6-201 to 6-324; §§ 55-208 to 55-308 (Title 55, Chapter 2 and Chapter 3, §§ 208-308, Title 6, Chapter 2 and Chapter 3)
Illinois Ill. Com. Stat. §§ 5/9-201 to 321 & 765 Ill. Comp. Stat. §§ 705/0.01 to 742/30 (Chapter 765 Sections 705 to 750)
Indiana Ind. Code Ann. §§ 32-31-1-1 to 32-31-9-15 (Title 32, Article 31)
Iowa Iowa Code Ann. §§ 562A.1 to 562A.37 (Title XIV, Subtitle 2, Chapter 562)
Kansas Kan. Stat. Ann. §§ 58-2501 to 58-2573 (Chapter 58, Article 25, §§ 2501-2573)
Kentucky Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 383.010 to 383.715 (Title XXXII, Chapter 383)
Louisiana La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 9:3251 to 9:3261; La. Civ. Code Ann. art. 2668 to 2729 (RS 9:3201 to 9:3341)
Maine Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 14, §§ 6001 to 6046 (Title 14, Part 7, Chapter 709, Subchapter 1)
Maryland Md. Code Ann. [Real Prop.] §§ 8-101 to 8-604 (Real Property, Article, Title 8)
Massachusetts Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 186, §§ 1 to 22 (Part II, Title I, Chapter 186)
Michigan Mich. Comp. Laws §§ 554.131 to .201; 554.601 to 554.641 (Chapter 554, Act 348 of 1972)
Minnesota Minn. Stat. Ann. §§ 504B.001 to 504B.471 (Chapter 504B)
Mississippi Miss. Code Ann. §§ 89-7-1 to 89-8-27 (Title 89, Chapter 7 and Chapter 8)
Missouri Mo. Rev. Stat. §§ 441.005 to 441.880; §§ 535.150 to 535.300 (Chapter 441, Chapter 535, 150-300)
Montana Mont. Code Ann. §§ 70-24-101 to 70-26-110 (Title 70, Chapter 24-Chapter 27)
Nebraska Neb. Rev. Stat. §§ 76-1401 to 76-1449 (Chapter 76)
Nevada Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 118A.010 to 118A.520; 40.215 to 40.280 (Title 10, Chapter 118 and Chapter 118A)
New Hampshire N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 540:1 to 540:29, 540-A:1 to 540-A:8 (

Title LV, Chapter 540, Title LV, Chapter 540-A)

New Jersey N.J. Stat. Ann. §§ 46:8-1 to 46:8-50; 2A:42-1 to 42-96 (Title 46, Chapter 8)
New Mexico N.M. Stat. Ann. §§ 47-8-1 to 47-8-51 (Chapter 47, Article 8)
New York N.Y. Real Prop. Law §§ 220 to 238; Real Prop. Acts §§ 701 to 853; Mult. Dwell. Law (all); Mult. Res. Law (all); Gen. Oblig. Law §§ 7-103 to 7-109 (RPP: Real Property - Article 7: Landlord and Tenant)
North Carolina N.C. Gen. Stat. §§ 42-1 to 42-14.2, 42-25.6 to 42-76 (Chapter 42: Landlord and Tenant)
North Dakota N.D. Cent. Code §§ 47-16-01 to 47-16-41 (Title 47, Chapter 16: Leasing of Real Property)
Ohio Ohio Rev. Code Ann. §§ 5321.01 to 5321.19 (Chapter 5321: Landlords and Tenants)
Oklahoma Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 41, §§ 1 to 136 (Title 41: Landlord and Tenant)
Oregon Or. Rev. Stat. §§ 90.100 to 91.225 (Chapter 90: Residential Landlord and Tenant)
Pennsylvania Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. §§ 250.101; 399.18 (Title 68, Chapter 8: Landlord and Tenant Act of 1951)
Rhode Island R.I. Gen. Laws §§ 34-18-1 to 34-18-57 (Title 34, Chapter 18: Residential Landlord and Tenant Act)
South Carolina S.C. Code Ann. §§ 27-40-10 to 27-40-940 (Title 27, Chapter 40: Residential Landlord and Tenant Act)
South Dakota S.D. Codified Laws Ann. §§ 43-32-1 to 43-32-29 (Chapter 43-32: Lease of Real Property)
Tennessee Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 66-28-101 to 66-28-521 (Title 66, Chapter 28)
Texas Tex. Prop. Code Ann. §§ 91.001 to 92.355 (Title 8, Chapter 91 and Chapter 92)
Utah Utah Code Ann. §§ 57-17-1 to 57-17-5; 57-22-1 to 57-22-6 (Title 57, Chapter 17, Title 57, Chapter 22)
Vermont Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 9, §§ 4451 to 4468 (Title 9, Chapter 137: Residential Rental Agreements)
Virginia Va. Code Ann. §§ 55-218.1 to 55-248.40 (Title 55, Chapters 13.1-13.3)
Washington Wash. Rev. Code Ann. §§ 59.04.010 to 59.04.900; 59.18.010 to 59.18.912 (Section 59.18: Residential Landlord-Tenant Act)
Washington DC D.C. Code Ann. §§ 42-3201 to 42-3610; D.C. Mun. Regs., tit. 14, §§ 300 to 315 (Title 42, Subtitle VII)
West Virginia W.Va. Code §§ 37-6-1 to 37-6-30 (Chapter 37, sections 6-1 to 6-30)
Wisconsin Wis. Stat. Ann. §§ 704.01 to 704.50; Wis. Admin. Code 134.01 to 134.10 (Chapter 704)
Wyoming Wyo. Stat. §§ 1-21-1201 to 1-21-1211; §§ 34-2-128 to 34-2-129 (Title 34, Chapter 2, Title 1, Chapter 21, Article 12)

Summary

Landlord tenant laws exist to protect both parties in a rental agreement. If you have questions about your rights as a landlord or as a renter, it is a good idea to speak with an attorney. You can also find our legal documents to get easily a lease agreement templates or an eviction notice.


All Legal Documents

Helpful Resources:
Landlord Tenant Laws - AAOA
Landlord Tenant Laws - LII
Fair Housing - HUD