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Eviction does not happen immediately in the United States for anything not criminal or dangerous. A noise complaint may cause a verbal or tenant noise complaint letter for the tenant. Homeowner's associations (HOAs) or landlords may also pass along letters or fines to a tenant. Because it's a minor issue in terms of complaints and lease violations, it would be nearly impossible for the landlord to take any further action in response to a single breach of contract.

Multiple instances of disturbing the quiet enjoyment of your neighbors' homes‌ would be different. To be safe, double-check your lease and state landlord-tenant laws for eviction reasons. Aside from that, landlords cannot evict tenants on their own. A judge must issue eviction orders, and the landlord must first serve a notice of intent to evict or eject the tenant.

If the tenant's response does not guarantee that the incident will not happen again, the landlord can file a complaint with the court and request a hearing to consider an eviction notice.

What Constitutes a Noise Disturbance?

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set the average exposure limit to environmental noise at 70 decibels (dB) over 24 hours (75 dB over 8 hours) in a 1974 report. According to the researchers, the highest average levels of noise that will allow spoken conversation, sleeping, working, and recreation are 55 dB outdoors and 45 dB indoors. These are average values, not maximum values.

These restrictions are not a rule or a regulation. Instead, they ‌provide state and local governments with the essential information to set their standards. A code enforcement officer with a sound level meter may be unavailable, and noise incidents occur randomly.

However, a provision in your county law establishes a noise disturbance offense in specific circumstances. The noise disturbance standards are more subjective, relying on witness observations and evidence and a code enforcement officer's opinion.

For example, the Montgomery County Noise Law defines a noise disturbance as any sound that is:

  • Annoying, offensive, loud, or obnoxiousness.
  • Strange time of day or area where it is heard from.
  • Harmful to any individual's health, comfort, or safety, and the reasonable enjoyment of the property and the allowed operation of a business.

The Police control noises linked with motorized vehicles (automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, dirt bikes, and ATVs). Note that this does not apply under the State Motor Vehicle Code and the Montgomery County Noise Control Law.

How to File For a Noise Complaint

Each jurisdiction has its own set of noise limits and rules, known as Noise Ordinance laws. These laws specify the hours of the day and night when excessive noise is forbidden (i.e., from 11 pm to 6 am). Check for your State Noise Ordinances Laws to determine the noise ordinance rules in your community. Here is how to file a complaint against a neighbor.

What Can a Tenant Do?

If the noisy behavior is unacceptable for your building or a sublease, a tenant noise complaint letter might do. This is because, in order to evict a tenant, a landlord must submit an eviction notice from the courts. This means a landlord will not be able to show up tomorrow and decide on a constructive eviction. It is up to the tenant to take the first measures toward resolving the issue.

Read the Fine Print

Eviction is the legal act of forcibly removing tenants from their rented homes, usually because they have committed a lease violation. Pull out your residential lease agreement or rental application and comb over the violations section.

Along with pet requirements and other prohibited conduct, there is often an outline of noise expectations in a lease agreement. Take note of the wording and know that there is probably terminology like "you must not behave in a loud or disturbing manner."

Speak with Your Neighbor

Your landlord may request that you first discuss the noise issue with your neighbor. The best-case scenario is that this completely resolves the problem — a neighbor may be unaware of the noise they're making. However, if you don't feel comfortable approaching a neighbor, there are other alternatives.

Ask for Assistance

If you've approached a neighbor and the noise hasn't stopped, you can seek help. Check your contract for specific noise clauses and write a tenant noise complaint letter requesting that your landlord address the issue. Some buildings have quiet hours or guest policies that may benefit your case.

Document the noise

Make a compelling case for why your landlord should intervene. Track when the noise occurs, what it is or sounds like, and how frequently it occurs. Include details about what happened, when it began, and how long it lasted. For example, "22 June - dogs barking from 10:15 am to 12:35 pm, I had to turn up the volume on my radio because it was loud enough to be heard in the living room."

If you believe the noise is "excessive" and your landlord refuses to address the problem, you can contact the police. It's best to call the cops as soon as the noise starts so you can explain why you believe a noise ordinance is being broken. Please dial your local non-emergency number instead of 911.

Move Out

If you're experiencing excessive noise and your landlord is unable or unwilling to assist you, you can pass for breach of contract. Have a paper trail of your efforts to address the noise problem and seek legal advice.

What Can a Landlord Do?

Landlords can only control the noise in their rental properties, and they must decide whether or not the noise is "excessive." A tenant has the right to enjoy peace and quiet, and a landlord who fails to address excessive noise may face financial consequences.

Determine the Source of the Noise and Notify the Tenant

A landlord must determine the source of the noise and assess the complaint. Some tenants may be overly sensitive to noise in their unit in some cases, even if it is everyday noise from a neighbor. A landlord must have written documentation of recurring noise problems and notify the tenant in violation to respond to a noise complaint.

Include a Noise Clause in the Lease

Because there are no concrete laws governing noise violations, the best way for a landlord to enforce noise regulations is to include them explicitly in the rental application. Specifying specific quiet hours or limiting the number of overnight guests permitted in a unit can help set guidelines for tenants while also providing a landlord with something to refer to in the event of a noise issue.

Take Action

Even if the landlord does not believe the noise is excessive or a violation, the landlord should address the tenant's noise concerns. The landlord must demonstrate that they have taken steps to resolve the issue, especially if further action is required. The landlord may also take steps to evict a tenant, causing noise problems.

Quiet the Noise

Noise complaints are among the most common (and challenging) situations for landlords and tenants. Every tenant has the right to the "quiet enjoyment" of their rental property, but the definition varies. Neighbors are permitted to make (some) noise in their homes, and landlords are only allowed to address noise disturbances they control.

A useful tool could be customizable lease templates, allowing you to include noise provisions or policies in each contract. This digital lease is easily accessible to both the landlord and the tenant.

Sources:

EPA - GOV

Noise Control - Montgomery County

Eviction does not happen immediately in the United States for anything not criminal or dangerous. A noise complaint may cause a verbal or tenant noise complaint letter for the tenant. Homeowner's associations (HOAs) or landlords may also pass along letters or fines to a tenant. Because it's a minor issue in terms of complaints and lease violations, it would be nearly impossible for the landlord to take any further action in response to a single breach of contract.

Multiple instances of disturbing the quiet enjoyment of your neighbors' homes‌ would be different. To be safe, double-check your lease and state landlord-tenant laws for eviction reasons. Aside from that, landlords cannot evict tenants on their own. A judge must issue eviction orders, and the landlord must first serve a notice of intent to evict or eject the tenant.

If the tenant's response does not guarantee that the incident will not happen again, the landlord can file a complaint with the court and request a hearing to consider an eviction notice.

What Constitutes a Noise Disturbance?

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set the average exposure limit to environmental noise at 70 decibels (dB) over 24 hours (75 dB over 8 hours) in a 1974 report. According to the researchers, the highest average levels of noise that will allow spoken conversation, sleeping, working, and recreation are 55 dB outdoors and 45 dB indoors. These are average values, not maximum values.

These restrictions are not a rule or a regulation. Instead, they ‌provide state and local governments with the essential information to set their standards. A code enforcement officer with a sound level meter may be unavailable, and noise incidents occur randomly.

However, a provision in your county law establishes a noise disturbance offense in specific circumstances. The noise disturbance standards are more subjective, relying on witness observations and evidence and a code enforcement officer's opinion.

For example, the Montgomery County Noise Law defines a noise disturbance as any sound that is:

  • Annoying, offensive, loud, or obnoxiousness.
  • Strange time of day or area where it is heard from.
  • Harmful to any individual's health, comfort, or safety, and the reasonable enjoyment of the property and the allowed operation of a business.

The Police control noises linked with motorized vehicles (automobiles, trucks, motorcycles, dirt bikes, and ATVs). Note that this does not apply under the State Motor Vehicle Code and the Montgomery County Noise Control Law.

How to File For a Noise Complaint

Each jurisdiction has its own set of noise limits and rules, known as Noise Ordinance laws. These laws specify the hours of the day and night when excessive noise is forbidden (i.e., from 11 pm to 6 am). Check for your State Noise Ordinances Laws to determine the noise ordinance rules in your community. Here is how to file a complaint against a neighbor.

What Can a Tenant Do?

If the noisy behavior is unacceptable for your building or a sublease, a tenant noise complaint letter might do. This is because, in order to evict a tenant, a landlord must submit an eviction notice from the courts. This means a landlord will not be able to show up tomorrow and decide on a constructive eviction. It is up to the tenant to take the first measures toward resolving the issue.

Read the Fine Print

Eviction is the legal act of forcibly removing tenants from their rented homes, usually because they have committed a lease violation. Pull out your residential lease agreement or rental application and comb over the violations section.

Along with pet requirements and other prohibited conduct, there is often an outline of noise expectations in a lease agreement. Take note of the wording and know that there is probably terminology like "you must not behave in a loud or disturbing manner."

Speak with Your Neighbor

Your landlord may request that you first discuss the noise issue with your neighbor. The best-case scenario is that this completely resolves the problem — a neighbor may be unaware of the noise they're making. However, if you don't feel comfortable approaching a neighbor, there are other alternatives.

Ask for Assistance

If you've approached a neighbor and the noise hasn't stopped, you can seek help. Check your contract for specific noise clauses and write a tenant noise complaint letter requesting that your landlord address the issue. Some buildings have quiet hours or guest policies that may benefit your case.

Document the noise

Make a compelling case for why your landlord should intervene. Track when the noise occurs, what it is or sounds like, and how frequently it occurs. Include details about what happened, when it began, and how long it lasted. For example, "22 June - dogs barking from 10:15 am to 12:35 pm, I had to turn up the volume on my radio because it was loud enough to be heard in the living room."

If you believe the noise is "excessive" and your landlord refuses to address the problem, you can contact the police. It's best to call the cops as soon as the noise starts so you can explain why you believe a noise ordinance is being broken. Please dial your local non-emergency number instead of 911.

Move Out

If you're experiencing excessive noise and your landlord is unable or unwilling to assist you, you can pass for breach of contract. Have a paper trail of your efforts to address the noise problem and seek legal advice.

What Can a Landlord Do?

Landlords can only control the noise in their rental properties, and they must decide whether or not the noise is "excessive." A tenant has the right to enjoy peace and quiet, and a landlord who fails to address excessive noise may face financial consequences.

Determine the Source of the Noise and Notify the Tenant

A landlord must determine the source of the noise and assess the complaint. Some tenants may be overly sensitive to noise in their unit in some cases, even if it is everyday noise from a neighbor. A landlord must have written documentation of recurring noise problems and notify the tenant in violation to respond to a noise complaint.

Include a Noise Clause in the Lease

Because there are no concrete laws governing noise violations, the best way for a landlord to enforce noise regulations is to include them explicitly in the rental application. Specifying specific quiet hours or limiting the number of overnight guests permitted in a unit can help set guidelines for tenants while also providing a landlord with something to refer to in the event of a noise issue.

Take Action

Even if the landlord does not believe the noise is excessive or a violation, the landlord should address the tenant's noise concerns. The landlord must demonstrate that they have taken steps to resolve the issue, especially if further action is required. The landlord may also take steps to evict a tenant, causing noise problems.

Quiet the Noise

Noise complaints are among the most common (and challenging) situations for landlords and tenants. Every tenant has the right to the "quiet enjoyment" of their rental property, but the definition varies. Neighbors are permitted to make (some) noise in their homes, and landlords are only allowed to address noise disturbances they control.

A useful tool could be customizable lease templates, allowing you to include noise provisions or policies in each contract. This digital lease is easily accessible to both the landlord and the tenant.

Sources:

EPA - GOV

Noise Control - Montgomery County