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Property owners would prefer to have cooperative tenants who follow the lease agreement. Sometimes this does not happen, and a landlord has to serve an eviction notice to terminate a landlord-tenant relationship.

A notice of eviction is the document a landlord serves a tenant when they wish to remove them from the premises. An eviction notice is served to a tenant when they fall behind in rent payment, abuse the premises, or have violated a contractual agreement.

The eviction process varies from state to state, but the eviction laws are largely similar regardless of where you live. Serving an eviction notice passes through several steps, including:

  • Preparing to serve the eviction
  • Looking for a legal delivery service
  • Following up to ensure delivery was successful
  • Filing an eviction complaint

Tenants often avoid being served an eviction notice to use it as an excuse for refusing to move out. Today, we will help you learn how to evict a tenant legally and effective methods for serving the papers.

How Is an Eviction Notice Served?

A landlord serves an eviction notice after the tenant has continued to violate the lease agreement or broken landlord-tenant law. The landlord has to understand that the eviction process doesn't happen overnight, and depending on the eviction process in each state, they have to follow specific steps. Generally, the steps for serving an eviction are similar. They include:

Step 1: Prepare the Eviction Notice

Thoroughly research your state's prerequisites for eviction and implement them before serving eviction papers. For example, check with your local court for guidance on what documents you need to give first before serving eviction papers.

Next, acquire the eviction notice from your local court's website or clerk's office. Ensure the eviction papers contain the necessary details. Vital information to include are:

  • Name of the tenant
  • The date you want them to vacate the property
  • Reason for the notice
  • The date the tenant needs to have remedied the problem to avoid eviction
  • A statement that you still hold the tenant responsible for the rent under the current terms of the tenancy

Step 2: Decide the Method to Serve the Eviction Notice

In most states, the landlord can directly deliver the eviction papers. If this method is acceptable in your state, deliver the papers and bring a witness to confirm you served the notice. You can also use a friend or family member to serve the papers—if your state allows it.

A professional legal server can deliver eviction papers in all states; they are mostly found in your local marshall's or sheriff's office. Additionally, a private process server is also a viable option in most states. Lastly, you can also serve the notice via certified mail and incorporate the "nail and mail" method.

Step 3: Confirm Delivery

If you delivered the letter personally, you have to wait for the date you had indicated for the tenant to vacate before taking further action. But if you sent it via certified mail, wait for a return receipt or the undelivered certified mail.

Step 4: File for an Eviction Complaint

Confirm the time you have to wait before filing a complaint with the local court clerk. The time varies depending on the method of service used. Once the legal time expires, you can officially file a complaint, and law enforcement will compel the tenant to vacate within 24 hours—if the courts haven't issued eviction moratoriums.

The success in serving an eviction notice depends on whether you drafted a legally binding eviction notice. To ensure you get it right, use LawDistrict's Eviction Notice Template, which covers all loopholes that the tenant may use to avoid eviction.

How Can an Eviction Notice Be Served?

An eviction notice can be served using various methods that ensure you execute the delivery legally and within the desired period. These methods include:

  • In-person: This method entails serving the person named with the eviction notice yourself. Landlords are allowed in most states to serve the eviction notice and prohibited in other states, such as New York.
  • Process server: An individual acts as a third party to deliver the notice and confirms the tenant receives it. They are professionals who ensure they abide by the state laws to avoid dismissal on the process service.
  • Certified mail: This method ensures the mail is highly likely to be delivered and has a return receipt in case of failure. It is difficult for a holdover tenant to argue their way out of not receiving the eviction notice via certified mail.
  • Law enforcement: A local law enforcement officer from the marshall's or sheriff's office ensures they deliver the eviction notice to the named person.

Once a tenant receives the eviction notice, they can fight the eviction in court, comply with your request to correct the mistakes, or move out.

How Can I Best Serve an Eviction Notice?

The most effective way to serve an eviction notice is to use certified mail with a return receipt. Afterward, post another copy of the eviction in a conspicuous place where the tenant cannot miss it. Certified mail gives you hard proof that you notified the tenant legally.

How Much Does it Cost to Serve an Eviction Notice?

Serving an eviction cost varies from state to state. Generally, it costs $60–$100 to initiate an eviction process against your tenant. Afterward, you will pay at least an additional $40–$70 to file the paperwork in court. In addition, if you use a law enforcement officer to serve the notice, you will pay them approximately $20–$50. And lastly, if the tenant refuses to vacate the property, you will file a complaint with the courts, costing $240–$400 in filing fees.

How Long Does it Take to Serve an Eviction Notice?

It takes approximately 3 to 30 days to serve an eviction notice. This timeline depends on each state's requirements for the eviction process, including the method a landlord can use to serve, the reason for eviction, and when they must serve the papers.

Serving an eviction notice is something landlords hope never happens. When it occurs, you can use an effective Eviction Notice Template that ensures you successfully carry out the eviction process.


Create your Eviction Notice Now

Sources:

Cornell Law

Oklahoma Judicial Processing

New York City Tenants Guide

ServeNow

Property owners would prefer to have cooperative tenants who follow the lease agreement. Sometimes this does not happen, and a landlord has to serve an eviction notice to terminate a landlord-tenant relationship.

A notice of eviction is the document a landlord serves a tenant when they wish to remove them from the premises. An eviction notice is served to a tenant when they fall behind in rent payment, abuse the premises, or have violated a contractual agreement.

The eviction process varies from state to state, but the eviction laws are largely similar regardless of where you live. Serving an eviction notice passes through several steps, including:

  • Preparing to serve the eviction
  • Looking for a legal delivery service
  • Following up to ensure delivery was successful
  • Filing an eviction complaint

Tenants often avoid being served an eviction notice to use it as an excuse for refusing to move out. Today, we will help you learn how to evict a tenant legally and effective methods for serving the papers.

How Is an Eviction Notice Served?

A landlord serves an eviction notice after the tenant has continued to violate the lease agreement or broken landlord-tenant law. The landlord has to understand that the eviction process doesn't happen overnight, and depending on the eviction process in each state, they have to follow specific steps. Generally, the steps for serving an eviction are similar. They include:

Step 1: Prepare the Eviction Notice

Thoroughly research your state's prerequisites for eviction and implement them before serving eviction papers. For example, check with your local court for guidance on what documents you need to give first before serving eviction papers.

Next, acquire the eviction notice from your local court's website or clerk's office. Ensure the eviction papers contain the necessary details. Vital information to include are:

  • Name of the tenant
  • The date you want them to vacate the property
  • Reason for the notice
  • The date the tenant needs to have remedied the problem to avoid eviction
  • A statement that you still hold the tenant responsible for the rent under the current terms of the tenancy

Step 2: Decide the Method to Serve the Eviction Notice

In most states, the landlord can directly deliver the eviction papers. If this method is acceptable in your state, deliver the papers and bring a witness to confirm you served the notice. You can also use a friend or family member to serve the papers—if your state allows it.

A professional legal server can deliver eviction papers in all states; they are mostly found in your local marshall's or sheriff's office. Additionally, a private process server is also a viable option in most states. Lastly, you can also serve the notice via certified mail and incorporate the "nail and mail" method.

Step 3: Confirm Delivery

If you delivered the letter personally, you have to wait for the date you had indicated for the tenant to vacate before taking further action. But if you sent it via certified mail, wait for a return receipt or the undelivered certified mail.

Step 4: File for an Eviction Complaint

Confirm the time you have to wait before filing a complaint with the local court clerk. The time varies depending on the method of service used. Once the legal time expires, you can officially file a complaint, and law enforcement will compel the tenant to vacate within 24 hours—if the courts haven't issued eviction moratoriums.

The success in serving an eviction notice depends on whether you drafted a legally binding eviction notice. To ensure you get it right, use LawDistrict's Eviction Notice Template, which covers all loopholes that the tenant may use to avoid eviction.

How Can an Eviction Notice Be Served?

An eviction notice can be served using various methods that ensure you execute the delivery legally and within the desired period. These methods include:

  • In-person: This method entails serving the person named with the eviction notice yourself. Landlords are allowed in most states to serve the eviction notice and prohibited in other states, such as New York.
  • Process server: An individual acts as a third party to deliver the notice and confirms the tenant receives it. They are professionals who ensure they abide by the state laws to avoid dismissal on the process service.
  • Certified mail: This method ensures the mail is highly likely to be delivered and has a return receipt in case of failure. It is difficult for a holdover tenant to argue their way out of not receiving the eviction notice via certified mail.
  • Law enforcement: A local law enforcement officer from the marshall's or sheriff's office ensures they deliver the eviction notice to the named person.

Once a tenant receives the eviction notice, they can fight the eviction in court, comply with your request to correct the mistakes, or move out.

How Can I Best Serve an Eviction Notice?

The most effective way to serve an eviction notice is to use certified mail with a return receipt. Afterward, post another copy of the eviction in a conspicuous place where the tenant cannot miss it. Certified mail gives you hard proof that you notified the tenant legally.

How Much Does it Cost to Serve an Eviction Notice?

Serving an eviction cost varies from state to state. Generally, it costs $60–$100 to initiate an eviction process against your tenant. Afterward, you will pay at least an additional $40–$70 to file the paperwork in court. In addition, if you use a law enforcement officer to serve the notice, you will pay them approximately $20–$50. And lastly, if the tenant refuses to vacate the property, you will file a complaint with the courts, costing $240–$400 in filing fees.

How Long Does it Take to Serve an Eviction Notice?

It takes approximately 3 to 30 days to serve an eviction notice. This timeline depends on each state's requirements for the eviction process, including the method a landlord can use to serve, the reason for eviction, and when they must serve the papers.

Serving an eviction notice is something landlords hope never happens. When it occurs, you can use an effective Eviction Notice Template that ensures you successfully carry out the eviction process.


Create your Eviction Notice Now

Sources:

Cornell Law

Oklahoma Judicial Processing

New York City Tenants Guide

ServeNow